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Briefings & Discussions

Event

Funders' Briefing on COVID-19 Vaccine

Monday, March 1, 2021
11:00am - 12:00pm

California has recently accelerated its vaccine distribution plan. While the vaccine rollout is in full swing, new challenges and inequities have surfaced in its community outreach, engagement, and rollout process. How should philanthropy use its collective power to respond to this crisis and provide support to public and community partners? What can we expect in 2021 as communities of color continue to face disproportionate health disparities and economic consequences? We invite you to join this briefing on Monday (03/01) at 11:00am PST to hear from leading experts on what you and your foundations can do during this critical stage in our history to control the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Follow up program: A Conversation on Equitable Vaccine Distribution

Following SCG’s March 1st Funders’ Briefing on the Covid-19 Vaccine, join SCG’s Health Funders on March 9th for an interactive follow-up conversation. We will hear updates from several local leaders and partners and then provide space for attendees to update one another on their work related to the vaccine, ask questions, and share identified needs and gaps. Learn more

 

Speakers

Isabel Becerra

CEO, Coalition of Orange County Community Health Centers  

Isabel Becerra is CEO of the Coalition of Orange County Community Health Centers. She has more than 30 years of experience working in public health. As CEO, she provides administrative leadership, financial direction and oversight of advocacy matters on behalf of Orange County community health centers. She also maintains effective relationships with elected officials, funders and other stakeholders. Prior to the Coalition, she worked at North County Health Services, a Federally Qualified Health Center in San Marcos, California. She was prepared for these roles through a MATCH Fellowship, a comprehensive program that educates leaders on all aspects of operating community health organizations sponsored by the National Association of Community Health Centers, Johns Hopkins University and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Becerra currently serves on multiple boards, including the California Wellness Foundation and the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Pomona College. Becerra was appointed a CalOptima director in August 2020.

 

Oliver T. Brooks, MD

Chief Medical Officer, Watts HealthCare Corporation & Co-Chair, California Covid-19 Drafting Guidelines Workgroup

Dr. Oliver Brooks has been with Watts Healthcare since 1989.  He was appointed Medical Director on October 16, 2016, and previously served as Associate Medical Director, Chief of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine and is the Medical Director for the Jordan and Locke School-based Wellness Centers.  He is also chairman of the quality management committee.

Appointments have included serving on the Executive Committee of Centinela Hospital where he was Chairman of their Peer Review Committee and on the Physician Quality Committee for LA Care Health Plan.  Dr. Brooks is past president of the Golden State (CA) Medical Association and past president of the Miller-Lawrence Medical and Dental Society. In 2019, he was elected to the office of the President of the National Medical Association.

Dr. Brooks holds a degree in chemistry from Morehouse College and a medical degree from Howard University.

 

Rose Veniegas

Senior Program Officer, Health, California Community Foundation  

With 23 years of experience in health promotion, Rosemary Veniegas currently serves as Senior Program Officer for Health at the California Community Foundation (CCF). CCF is the third oldest community foundation in the U.S., after Cleveland Community Foundation and Chicago Community Trust, with a mission to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles (LA) County. Dr. Veniegas serves as the Chair of the LA County Commission on Hospitals and Healthcare Delivery as well as co-chair of the LA COVID-19 Vaccine Work Group Aligning Resources Committee. Previously, Dr. Veniegas was an implementation scientist and researcher in academic departments of family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, psychology, and psychiatry. She received her Ph.D. in social psychology from UCLA. She was a 2017 recipient of the Victory Institute Bohnett Leaders Fellowship to participate in the Harvard Kennedy School Senior Executives in State and Local Government Program.

 

Aquilina Soriano Versoza

Executive Director, Pilipino Workers Center

Aquilina Soriano Versoza is Executive Director of the Pilipino Workers Center of Southern California, a nonprofit serving and organizing Pilipino immigrant workers in Los Angeles. Aquilina is also serving as the current President of the Board of Directors of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and a general Board Member of Mission Assets. She was a recipient of the 2018 Frederick Douglass 200 Abolitionist award. She studied her BA in Asian American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.


Presented in partnership with:



Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current EPIP, SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
EPIP, NCG, & Catalyst members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

Philanthropy’s Role in Addressing Inequity in South LA and Advancing Policy and Systems Change

Thursday, February 25, 2021
10:00am - 11:30am

In South LA and elsewhere, Black and Brown communities remain vulnerable to disparities in all facets of life and multiple forms of displacement and erasure. This virtual presentation will be an opportunity to learn about how complex and deep structural and systemic racial injustice continues to serve as a destructive force in driving inequities in health, housing, employment, incarceration, and deportation, and the environment. A centerpiece of the webinar will be “South Central Rooted,” the timely report recently released by South Los Angeles Building Healthy Communities Collaborative to uplift an intersectional health equity lens that centers the narrative of those with lived experience. With the report as a backdrop, movement leaders will address emerging issues, including impacts from COVID19; and shine a light on the organizing frameworks and the strategies they have been using for years to break the cycles of injustice. Gain an understanding of how they are cultivating Brown and Black power to advance policy and systems change and how philanthropy can contribute to long-term solutions that move beyond simply responding to the current crises.

 

Background

Since the inception of the South LA Building Healthy Communities Collaborative, South LA partners have strived to champion policy initiatives and grassroots efforts to close the racial equity gap. Through deep community partnerships, research and advocacy, they are working to shift the dominant narrative that criminalizes, dehumanizes, and erases low-income Black and Brown communities.

South Los Angeles Building Healthy Communities Collaborative recently released a report: South Central Rooted. Developed with input from over 30 South LA community organizations and 125 resident leaders, South Central Rooted sheds light upon the systemic inequity that still impacts our community over 25 years after the LA Uprising. Given its particular history of oppression and resistance, the South Central community is poised to explore the question: what will it actually take to ensure low-income communities of color can thrive in Los Angeles over the next 50 years? Drawing from existing academic and community-based research, focus group conversations with South Central residents, policy reports, and media coverage, this report hopes to demonstrate that the answer lies with intersectional systems change approaches led by grassroots leaders.

As we begin to see more narratives around COVID19, we will also see policies, practices, and narratives that disproportionately impact Black and Brown communities. The call to prioritize equity and the power of narrative are more important than ever.

 

Moderator

Manuel Pastor

Director, USC Program in Environmental and Regional Equity

Dr. Manuel Pastor is a Distinguished Professor of Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California (USC). He currently directs the USC Equity Research Institute (formerly known as Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) and the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (CSII). Pastor is the Turpanjian Chair in Civil Society and Social Change at USC, and holds an economics Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Pastor’s research has generally focused on issues of the economic, environmental and social conditions facing low-income urban communities – and the social movements seeking to change those realities. Pastor’s most recent books covering those topics include State of Resistance: What California's Dizzying Descent and Remarkable Resurgence Means for America's Future (New Press 2018), and Equity, Growth, and Community: What the Nation Can Learn from America's Metro Areas, co-authored with Chris Benner (UC Press 2015).

Pastor currently serves on California Governor Gavin Newsom’s Council of Economic Advisors and on the California Business and Jobs Recovery Task Force. He previously served on the California Strategic Growth Council, the Commission on Regions appointed by California’s Speaker of the State Assembly, and the Regional Targets Advisory Committee for the California Air Resources Board.  In 2012, he received the Liberty Hill Foundation’s Wally Marks Changemaker of the Year award for social justice research partnership, and in 2017, he was awarded the Champion for Equity award from Advancement Project, California.

 

Speakers

Barbara Lott Holland

Associate Director, Labor Community Strategy Center

Recruited on the bus in 1998, Barbara has been a cornerstone of the organization since then. A resident of South LA and a transit-dependent bus rider for nearly four decades, Barbara has been elected by our members to the BRU’s leadership body, the Planning Committee, for twelve years running. She has acted as Co-Chair of the Planning Committee and of the Monthly Membership Meeting for ten years. During that time, she has served as spokesperson and representative of the BRU in the media, with public officials in LA and Washington, and in national and international social movement forums. Barbara also sits on the Steering Committee of the Community Rights Campaign and represents the CRC in its coalition work. She is the only recipient of the Strategy Center’s W.E.B. Dubois Fellowship (2009-2009).

Karen Mack

Founder, LA Commons

Twenty years ago, Karen Mack founded LA Commons, an organization that empowers Los Angeles' diverse communities by facilitating local engagement in arts and culture as well as in other important issues - health, transportation, and education, to name a few, giving residents and particularly young people, a voice and an onramp to making positive change.  Ms. Mack served as a Public Service Fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School, studying the role of culture in community building. She holds an MPA from this school as well as an MBA from UCLA. She is a mayoral appointee to LA City Planning Commission (equity chair) and a supervisorial appointee to the Advisory Board for LA County’s Cultural Equity and Inclusion Initiative.

Laura Muraida

Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education (SCOPE)

Laura Muraida is Director of Research and Communications at Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education (SCOPE), a South Los Angeles community-based organization that builds grassroots power to achieve economic, environmental, and racial justice. Since 2014, Laura has led the organization’s research and communications strategy and has advanced campaigns for equitable public investment, environmental justice, and civic engagement. Prior to SCOPE, Laura helped launch a community-based redistricting program to ensure fair political representation in historically marginalized communities across Texas. For over a decade, Laura has worked to provide grassroots communities the data, tools, and information to build power. Laura was born and raised in San Antonio and has a Master’s Degree in Urban Planning from the University of Texas at Austin and a Bachelor’s Degree in Anthropology from New York University. http://scopela.org/

Benjamin Torres

President/CEO, The Community Development Technologies Center (CDTech)

Benjamin Torres is the President/CEO of the Community Development Technologies Center (CDTech), a nonprofit organization focused on addressing racial equity and economic justice in low-income areas of Los Angeles. CDTech empowers marginalized residents to lead the process of community development efforts. Through education, training, workforce, and community organizing strategies, CDTech supports people to fight for systems change and resource development opportunities while preparing those same communities to take advantage of the change and opportunities they generate. Benjamin’s entire career has been focused on placing the tools of democracy directly in the hands of our most marginalized residents through education, training, engagement, and multi-ethnic/racial community building.

For the last 23 years, his leadership has supported the South LA region’s Black/Brown residents to increase their political capital and economic opportunity. He has developed efforts to create inclusive, democratic, and power building strategies utilizing highly effective public, private, nonprofit, and community partnerships.

He is committed to progressive movement-building efforts and serves on the Board of Directors of several key local and national organizations. He also serves as President of the City of LA Commission on Community and Family Services, and he also serves on the LA County Public Health Equity Task Force Commission.

 

Presented by:


  

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & Catalyst members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected].

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Event

CCJFG: Closing DJJ the Right Way | Part 2

Wednesday, February 17, 2021
3:00pm - 4:30pm

In September 2020, Governor Newsom signed SB 823, a historic bill that will lead to the closure of California’s Division of Juvenile Justice. The legislature is currently working on the development of the Office of Youth and Community Restoration is currently guiding each of California’s 58 counties to develop rehabilitative and healing programs that are alternatives to youth imprisonment, while also allocating grants to each county to fund these services.

We want an end to youth imprisonment, however, the implementation of SB 823 poses many complications. While activists, advocates, and directly impacted community members create plans for community-based services and the distribution of resources, the Chief Probation Officers Department and other state actors object to these shifts and are positioning themselves as the entity to control the resources. Meanwhile, prosecutors continue to transfer youth directly into the adult prison—a tactic that negates the intention of SB 823 and the years of organizing it took to get here.

Hear from youth justice organizers across the state currently developing implementation plans for their counties; we will discuss the challenges and needs of organizers, advocates, and people most directly impacted by this legislation.

 

Register for Part 1

Closing DJJ the Right Way: Register >

 

Speakers

We will announce speakers soon.

 

Presented in partnership with:
 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and CCJFG members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & CCJFG members: Register online (you must log into your account to register).
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

An Equitable and Resilient Future: Perspectives from Philanthropic Leaders

Tuesday, February 9, 2021
3:00pm - 4:30pm

Philanthropy and the nonprofits they support were engaged in incredible work at the start of 2020. But the world drastically changed in March of last year. As we battle with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it's disproportionate effect on BIPOC communities, and witness a rise in insurgency to our democratic principles, we are reminded of our constant struggle with the historical and generational pandemics of anti-Black racism and white supremacy. It's as crucial as ever to ask, what does all of this mean for the work of philanthropy? How do we hold what we've experienced, shape a strategic agenda that takes on the issues we currently face (while remembering that many of these issues are historical), and advance or shift the work we deemed important prior to the pandemic?

We will talk with philanthropic leaders from across the state to hear how they're thinking about their institutions' future work, their plans for 2021, and what they're struggling with as they look to take on the myriad issues that face our communities and the nation.

 

Join us to hear about:

  • Funding strategies and approaches for 2021 and beyond
  • Perspectives on the current role of philanthropy
  • Philanthropic actions that responded to the pandemic that should become a regular practice
  • Opportunities for philanthropy to address anti-Blackness and racial justice
  • Long-term strategies for recovery and resiliency

 

Speakers

We will announce more speakers soon.

  • Fred Blackwell, CEO, San Francisco Foundation
  • Sandra Hernandez, President & CEO, California Healthcare Foundation (moderator)
  • Miki Woodard, Head of Good Robot at Bad Robot Productions 

 

Presented by:



Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & Catalyst members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

CCJFG: Closing DJJ the Right Way | Part 1

Monday, February 8, 2021
1:00pm - 2:30pm

In September 2020, Governor Newsom signed SB 823, a historic bill that will lead to the closure of California’s Division of Juvenile Justice. Legislature is currently working on the development of the Office of Youth and Community Restoration (OYCR) which will be the agency responsible for overseeing local youth justice systems. OYCR will also be responsible for ensuring that each of California’s 58 counties develop rehabilitative and healing programs that keep youth in their communities while also allocating grants to each county to fund these services. 

We want an end to youth imprisonment, however, the implementation of SB 823 poses many challenges. In order to ensure effective implementation of this legislation, each County is required to convene a subcommittee of system stakeholders and at least three community representatives. In many counties these subcommittees are far from being developed and in some, community representatives are being handpicked. Furthermore, the Chief Probation Officers of California, who were opposed to SB 823, are positioning themselves to control the plans for facilities and placement and funding. Meanwhile, prosecutors continue to transfer youth directly into the adult prison—a tactic that negates the intention of SB 823 and the years of organizing it took to get here. 

Join us for a two-part series to learn more about SB 823 and what is happening right now to ensure that the community gains control of the transformation of California’s youth justice system and how philanthropy can support closing DJJ the right way.

 

Register for Part 2

Closing DJJ the Right Way Webinar Series: Register >

 

Speakers

Frankie Guzman 

Attorney, Director, Youth Justice Initiative

Attorney Francis (“Frankie”) V. Guzman is the Director of the California Youth Justice Initiative at the National Center for Youth Law. Frankie leads a team of attorneys, policy advocates, and community organizers working to eliminate the practice of prosecuting and incarcerating children in California’s adult criminal justice system, reduce incarceration and justice system involvement, and increase developmentally-appropriate services in communities for youth.

Raised in a poor, mostly immigrant community plagued by crime and drugs, Guzman experienced his parents’ divorce and his family’s subsequent homelessness at age 3, the life-imprisonment of his 16-year-old brother at age 5, and lost numerous childhood friends to violence. At age 15, he was arrested for armed robbery and, on his first offense, was sentenced to serve 15 years in the California Youth Authority. Released on parole after six years, Frankie attended law school and became an expert in juvenile law and policy with a focus on ending the prosecution of juveniles as adults.

Through partnerships with community organizations and advocacy groups, Guzman has helped lead California’s effort to reduce the number of youths prosecuted as adults and serving time in adult prisons by passing legislation that established Youth Offender Parole Hearings, reformed Juvenile Transfer Hearings, and eliminated prosecutors’ direct file authority. More recently, Frankie helped lead statewide efforts to eliminate California’s practice of prosecuting 14 and 15-year-olds as adults, prohibit the incarceration of children under age 12 in the juvenile system, and secure approximately $60 million dollars to expand pre-arrest diversion programs and developmentally-appropriate, culturally-relevant community-based services for youth in CA.

Abraham Medina

Convener and Coordinator, California Alliance for Youth and Community Justice

Abraham Medina (he/him) currently serves as the convener, coordinator, and process holder of the California Alliance for Youth and Community Justice (CAYCJ). Prior to that, he served as Executive Director of the National Youth Alliance on Boys and Men of Color (NYABMOC). Abraham left Mexico City when he was seven years old with his mother and younger brother as a result of domestic violence. Abraham and his brother were separated from their mother and crossed the U.S. border experiencing family separation and a form of child detention. Eventually, he reunited with his mother in the U.S. Abraham was undocumented until receiving DACA in 2013 and is in the process of becoming a U.S. Permanent Resident. Abraham grew up an undocumented person of color in the U.S., impacted by and working to transform the school-to-prison-to-deportation pipeline and the justice system as we know it, through Afro-Indigenous concepts, approaches, and models of justice. Due to being undocumented, Abraham was a day laborer and a roasted peanuts street vendor from age 13 to 14. His current focus as a convener is to cultivate transformative collective power for personal, community, and systems transformation.

Abraham earned his B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Irvine. In 2018, he also earned a master of Legal and Forensic Psychology from the University of California, Irvine studying under the guidance and direction of Dr. Elizabeth Cauffman and Dr. Ray Novaco.

Presented in partnership with:
 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and CCJFG members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & CCJFG members: Register online (you must log into your account to register).
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

Arts in Education Action Forum: Envisioning Arts Education’s Role in Advancing Los Angeles County over the Next Decade

Thursday, January 28, 2021
10:00am - 12:00pm

In October 2020, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors adopted the Arts for All: Children, Youth, and Families, Los Angeles County’s New Regional Blueprint for Arts Education, which puts forward a vision of expanding the scope of arts education in school, after school, and in communities, and centers equity, healing-informed practice, and creative career pathways. Join the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture and local youth leaders in the arts to: Learn about and examine the new Regional Blueprint for Arts Education Surface important roles for arts education in addressing historical inequities Envision healing-informed, culturally inclusive, and arts-based strategies to support youth and their communities Offer space to envision an expanded role for arts education, particularly in the context of COVID-19 and the eventual rebound from the pandemic Southern California Grantmakers partners with the Arts Ed Collective Funders Council, a regional collaborative of public and private funders, to co-host events that generate dialogue and build understanding about promising practices in arts education across the broader philanthropic field. Members of the Funders Council pool their resources, track and respond to trends in arts and education and determine how funds should be allocated to most effectively advance the shared goals of the Los Angeles County Arts Ed Collective. Fee No cost to participate Who May Attend LA Arts Funders Group is open to public and private sector grantmakers that fund arts grants in the Southern California region. Grantmaking organizations that also solicit funds are expected to designate representatives whose role involves program and/or policy, not solely development. Philanthropic consultants must be current members of Southern California Grantmakers. If you're a grantmaker, but aren't an SCG member or haven't attended an LA Arts Funders meeting before, please email Morgan Bennett at [email protected] to confirm your eligibility. Accommodations for People with Disabilities If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs. No Solicitation Policy Please note that LA Arts Funders has a no-solicitation policy in order to allow for candid peer discussions among philanthropy colleagues.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

California's Master Plan for Early Learning and Care

Monday, January 25, 2021
10:30am - 12:00pm

Since coming to office, Governor Gavin Newsom has made bold investments in California's children- from $1.8 billion in early childhood to a comprehensive paid family leave policy. Last year, Governor Newsom's budget allocated $5 million to develop a California Master Plan for Early Learning and Care, aiming to provide a roadmap for improving its early childhood education and care system. The deep disparities exposed by COVID-19 and the surge of the movement for racial justice in 2020 have altered California's early childhood landscape in critical ways, underscoring the importance of addressing equity and inclusion in the Master Plan report.

Over the past year, under the Early Childhood Action Research Team's guidance and with the Early Childhood Policy Council's input, state leaders have been working hard to develop this blueprint unveiled on December 1, 2020.

As part of the launch of the Master Plan, the state is excited to share the report's findings with the public and early childhood stakeholders throughout the state while also lifting various public-private partnerships that will support the vision of the new plan in 2021 and beyond.

Join us for a webinar on California's Master Plan for Early Learning and Care to:

  • Understand the key components of the Master Plan and the recommended steps necessary to establish universal preschool, better support the early childhood workforce and low income-providers, and improve overall equity and access to quality learning and care, among other areas
  • Engage in discussion with funders and early childhood stakeholders to learn how philanthropy can educate, advocate, and partner with government to ensure the most effective and equitable implementation of the Master Plan
  • Engage with various leaders from the Master Plan team from the Governor's Office, Department of Health and Human Services, and Early Childhood Action Research Team
  • Learn about the various public-private partnerships opportunities that were included within the plan as well as those announced alongside it to catalyze future collaboration

 

Speakers

  • Lupita Alcala, Director of Education Policy & Outcomes, WestEd
  • Congresswoman Sara Jacobs (CA-53), Founder and Chair, San Diego for Every Child
  • Erin Hogeboom, Director, San Diego for Every Child
  • Kim Johnson, Director, California Department of Social Services
  • September Jarrett, Program Officer, Education Program, Heising-Simons Foundation
  • Jannelle Kubinec, Chief Administrative Officer, WestEd
  • Meera Mani, Director, Children, Families, and Communities (CFC) Program, Packard Foundation
  • Giannina Pérez, Senior Policy Advisor for Early Childhood, Office of Governor Gavin Newsom
  • Kris Perry, Deputy Secretary for Early Childhood Development, California Health and Human Services Agency\
  • Kim Pattillo Brownson, Director of Strategy and Policy, Los Angeles, Ballmer Group
  • Megan Thomas, Interim President, Catalyst

 

Moderator

  • Kathleen Kelly Janus, Senior Advisor on Social Innovation, Office of Governor Gavin Newsom

 

Presented in partnership with:


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members

Registration
SCG members: Register online.
NCG & Catalyst members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

COVID-19 Funders’ Briefing: 2021 Outlook

Tuesday, December 15, 2020
2:00pm - 3:00pm

As COVID-19 case rates continue to climb nationwide, new federal leadership and promising vaccine trials present some hope for the coming year. As we continue to grapple with the public health repercussions, California also faces serious economic consequences. Communities of color are facing disproportionate impacts across the board, and many sectors including nonprofits and local governments are in perilous financial situations. Join us to hear more about what we should expect in 2021, how the issues philanthropy cares about will be affected, and what we can do to respond.

 

Speaker

Chris Hoene

Executive Director, California Budget & Policy Center

Chris Hoene became the Budget Center’s executive director in October 2012, bringing to the organization 15 years of leadership in state and local policy research and analysis. He leads the strategic direction of the organization, acts as primary spokesperson, and works with the board of directors and community partners to implement our vision and mission. Prior to joining the Budget Center, Chris was director of the Center for Research and Innovation at the National League of Cities in Washington, DC, leading efforts to analyze trends in local and state government and promote constructive policy action on issues including public finance, economic development, housing, poverty reduction, infrastructure, and governance.  Chris also previously worked for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington, DC, and the Public Policy Institute of California in San Francisco. Chris holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Claremont Graduate University and a bachelor’s degree in Political Science of the College of Idaho. In 2011, in recognition of his service to the state and local community, Chris was elected as a Fellow into the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA).

Dr. Christina Ghaly, M.D.

Director, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services

Dr. Ghaly was appointed by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors as the Director of the Department of Health Services (DHS) on September 25, 2018 after having served in the role as Acting Director since October 2017. In this capacity, Dr. Ghaly has had responsibility for overseeing the operations of the County’s four public hospitals and 23 outpatient clinics. She leads strategic, operational, and clinical/financial initiatives critical to DHS’ financial health and continued transformation in an era of health reform.

Dr. Ghaly previously served as Chief Operations Officer for DHS from 2016 until her permanent appointment as Director.  Her previous roles within DHS also include serving as the Deputy Director for Strategy and Operations and as the Interim Chief Executive Officer at Olive View – UCLA Medical Center and LAC+USC Medical Center.

In 2015, Dr. Ghaly served in a temporary role as the Director of Health Care Integration for the County of Los Angeles Chief Executive Office. This position was created to lead an assessment regarding the potential creation of a health care agency, integrating the Departments of Health Services, Mental Health (DMH) and Public Health (DPH). The Los Angeles County Health Agency was formally created in November 2015.

Dr. Ghaly attended Harvard Medical School and completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Ghaly currently sees patients in the urgent care and on the inpatient medicine service at LAC+USC Medical Center and  Olive View – UCLA Medical Center, respectively.

Deepa Iyer

Director of Movement Building, Building Movement Project; Director, Solidarity Is

Deepa Iyer is a South Asian American writer, lawyer, facilitator, and activist. She is the Director of Movement Building at Building Movement Project and director of Solidarity Is, a project that provides trainings, narratives, and resources on building deep and lasting multiracial solidarity and sustainability of social change ecosystems.

Iyer served as executive director of South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT) for a decade, and has held positions at Race Forward, the US Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, the Asian Pacific American Legal Resource Center, and the Asian American Justice Center.

Iyer’s first book We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future (The New Press 2015), received a 2016 American Book Award. She hosts a podcast called Solidarity Is This to explore solidarity practices around the country. Iyer has received fellowships from Open Society Foundations and the Social Change Initiative, and in 2019, she received an honorary doctoral degree from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Iyer serves on the Advisory Council of the Emergent Fund.

An immigrant who moved to Kentucky from India when she was twelve, Iyer graduated from the University of Notre Dame Law School and Vanderbilt University.

Presented by:

 

 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and SDG members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & SDG members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

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