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Event

NCFP: Family Identity and Culture

Thursday, February 11, 2021
9:00am - 10:15am

Many philanthropic families have a strong sense of identity, defined by their traditions and culture and carried out through their commitments to one another and the public trust. A clear family identity is driven by a shared purpose and philosophy, which in turn promotes a successful collective giving effort. How do families understand their shared purpose and ensure it faithfully guides them in their work? What is the role of the individual in relation to the collective? How does culture affect the approaches that families employ? Learn how families cultivate their philanthropic identity and nurture a family culture that reflects a shared sense of purpose.

 

About this Series

The monthly Fundamentals of Family Philanthropy webinar series provides guidance on the core tenets of effective family philanthropy—from motivations and values to governance, grantmaking, and succession. The series equips giving families with the latest information on evergreen topics in the donor lifecycle through practical takeaways and diverse family stories that illustrate important practices. Designed for seasoned practitioners and newcomers alike, the series is available to our Friends of the Family and Partner Subscriber organizations.

SCG members get free access to all webinars from the National Center for Family Philanthropy. 

 

Presented By

National Center for Family Philanthropy

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Event

LA County Child Welfare Funders Collaborative Meeting February

Thursday, February 4, 2021
9:00am - 10:30am

We are excited to kick off the new year with a deeper dive into the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA) and what it means for Los Angeles County. During the meeting, we will receive an overview of the legislation; hear updates on Los Angeles County’s FFPSA plan and implementation, and begin to explore the ways in which philanthropy can have an impact. Attendees will be able to engage in a Q & A session with those leading this important work, and also hear pertinent updates on other child welfare initiatives from County leadership.

 

Speakers

Susan Abrams

Policy Director, Children’s Law Center

Susan Abrams has been working at CLC since 2005. She began her career implementing an Equal Justice Works fellowship project, where she sought to reduce the rate of dependent youth entering the juvenile justice system. Following her fellowship, Ms. Abrams worked as a staff attorney for several years until she transitioned from the courtroom to focus on macro level policy work. She now serves as CLC’s Director of Policy and Training – developing and strategizing CLC’s public policy priorities and legislative advocacy efforts at the local, state and national levels.  In addition to Ms. Abrams’ work with CLC, she has served as President of the Board for Happy Trails for Kids, a non-profit that she co-founded that provides overnight summer camp for children in foster care. Ms. Abrams earned a BA from UC Berkeley in 2001 and a JD from Harvard Law School in 2005.

Carrie Miller

Assistant Executive Director, Los Angeles County Office of Child Protection

Carrie Dunbar Miller is the Assistant Executive Director of the Los Angeles County Office of Child Protection where she leads a variety of initiatives in the areas of prevention, child safety, and data sharing. Previously, she served as the Manager for the Los Angeles County Chief Executive Office’s Service Integration Branch (SIB), overseeing the Countywide Gang Strategy, Education Coordinating Council, Information Technology Infrastructure Development Unit, Research and Evaluation Unit, Contracting and Administrative Support Unit, Housing and Homeless Unit, and various initiatives integrating services for system-involved youth across departments. Before joining SIB, she served as the Director of the Los Angeles County Education Coordinating Council, a collaborative body charged with raising the educational achievement of foster and probation youth. Prior to that, she served as the Education Program Director for United Friends of the Children, working with foster and probation youth ages 12 to 23 on getting them to and through 4-year colleges/universities. Miller received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Howard University.

Karen D. Richardson, LCSW

Deputy Director, Administrative Support Bureau, Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services

Karen began her service with the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) in 1989 as a Children’s Social Worker in the Adoption Division. She has gone on to serve in leadership positions in DCFS’ Adoption and Permanency Resources Division and Out-of-Home Care Management Division, as well as the Juvenile Court and Adoptions Bureau, where she was responsible for managing three countywide divisions: Juvenile Court Services, Resource Family Recruitment and Approval, and the Resource Family Support and Permanency Divisions.  In July 2020 Karen was assigned to lead the Administrative Support Bureau, which includes the Contracts Administration Division, Out-of-Home Care Management Division, Continuous Quality Improvement Division, Policy, Leadership and Staff Development Division, and Facilities Management.

Karen received a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology from the University of California, at Los Angeles (UCLA) and a Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Southern California (USC). She is also a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) in the state of California.

She is committed to fostering positive outcomes for children while endeavoring to support caregivers, service providers and staff.

Winnie Wechsler

Executive Director, The Anthony & Jeanne Pritzker Family Foundation

Winnie Wechsler is executive director of the Anthony & Jeanne Pritzker Family Foundation (www.ajpff.org), which for over a decade has been investing in strengthening many of the unique institutions that define Los Angeles.  The Foundation aims to enrich our community not just for the present, but for generations to come, with particular focus on medicine, higher education, the environment, and the arts. In 2014, the foundation launched Pritzker Foster Care Initiative to highlight its commitment to supporting transition age foster youth and the families that care for them.

Winnie’s interest in the potential of technology to improve child welfare stems from her decades of experience in both the public and private sectors.  Before joining the Foundation in 2012, Ms. Wechsler served as executive director of Phoenix Houses of California, a substance abuse treatment and mental health services organization, for nine years. Before working in non-profit management, Ms. Wechsler worked for twenty years in media and communications, including serving as a senior executive at The Walt Disney Company for 14 years. While at Disney, she headed up new business development for the Disney Channel and started up and managed Disney.com.  In 1999, she left Disney to launch Lightspan, an education technology start-up that she helped take public in 2000.

Ms. Wechsler is a board member of Foster Care Counts, a non-profit started by Jeanne Pritzker, which helps raise awareness and serve the needs of foster youth and families in Los Angeles. She has lived with her family for over 20 years in Santa Monica, where she is a commissioner on the City of Santa Monica’s Social Service Commission and a member of the Executive Steering Committee of Community for Excellent Public Schools.  She holds a BA from Wellesley College in Russian Studies and an MBA from The Wharton School of The University of Pennsylvania. 

 

About LA County Child Welfare Funders Collaborative Meeting

SCG LA County Child Welfare Collaborative group convenes quarterly to focus on policy reform and related advocacy efforts in the areas of child welfare and foster care; and to explore opportunities for private support for the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services related projects.

 

Quarterly Dates

Thursday, May 27 | 9:00am - 10:30am       Learn more >>>

Thursday, August 12 | 9:00am - 10:30am   Learn more >>>

Thursday, November 4 | 9:00am - 10:30am    Learn more >>>

 

Presented in partnership with:


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
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Event

Addressing the Student Basic Needs Crisis: Seeing Students as Humans First

Thursday, January 28, 2021
10:00am - 11:30am

Students are facing more financial emergencies than ever before and institutions of higher education across the country are struggling to pivot to offer the help and support that students need. Much attention has been given to stop out rates, drop out rates, and decreasing enrollment and transfer rates. The concept of a lost generation of students has permeated higher education circles, conferences, and forums.

What is missing from these conversations? The idea of seeing students as humans first.

Pre-COVID, 43% of students at two and four year universities in the United States were food insecure. 48% of them faced housing insecurity, and 16% of them experienced homelessness. Since the pandemic hit, a survey of 38,000 students conducted by the Hope Center for College Community and Justice indicated that 3 in 5 students (60%) were experiencing basic needs insecurity. 63% of students at four year colleges and 50% of students at two year colleges reported that they couldn’t concentrate on school because of the pandemic.

The student basic needs crisis that existed prior to the pandemic has hit a tipping point, and students that were barely “making it” have joined those already impacted by the crisis and have been forced to re-evaluate their short and long term futures. This often means eliminating higher education from their plans.

Fortunately, there is hope amid this daunting landscape. Join us for a conversation with the nation’s leading experts on Student Basic Needs to evaluate where we stand in our response to help students and what relief 2021 might bring.

 

Panelists

  • Dr. Sara Goldrick-Rab, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Medicine, Temple University; Founder and President, Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice
  • Dr. Rashida Crutchfield, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Work, California State University, Long Beach
  • Rachel Sumekh, Founder and CEO, Swipe Out Hunger

 

Partnership

 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members and eligible non-members

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.


     
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Event

LA Partnership for Early Childhood Investment Meeting

Thursday, January 21, 2021
10:00am - 11:00am

Welcoming a child into the world is one of the most joyous and universal human experiences. But too often, depression and anxiety during pregnancy and postpartum take a heavy toll on expecting and new mothers. The harm can impact infants and toddlers, as well, ranging from poor nutrition and higher preterm births to low birth weight and challenges with bonding and attachment.

The ongoing COVID-19 crisis and systemic racism exacerbate these problems. Incidents are highest among Black women and three-quarters of mothers with perinatal depression or anxiety never receive treatment - either because they don’t seek help or their doctors don’t recognize their symptoms. 

On Thursday, January 21 at 10:00 a.m., join a panel of leading experts to learn more about the pervasive nature of perinatal and postpartum depression, the impacts on mothers and newborn babies, ways to prevent and treat maternal mental health issues, and how philanthropy can help overcome the systemic barriers to better care. 

 

Speakers

Kelly O'Connor Kay

Executive Director, Maternal Mental Health NOW

Sayida Peprah, PsyD

Founder, Executive Director, Director of Diversity & Training Diversity Uplifts

Stephanie Teleki, PhD, MPH

Director, Learning and Impact, California Health Care Foundation

 

Moderator

Sonya Young Aadam

Chief Executive Officer, CA Black Women’s Health Project


Presented in partnership with:

 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event type 
Event

Emergent Strategy Ideation Workshop

Tuesday, January 19, 2021
2:00pm - 3:30pm

Join SCG on the 2021 National Day of Racial Healing for a virtual experience centering and uplifting the practices and knowledge of Black femmes. Lively conversations and workshops will guide us to remember, reciprocate, and reconnect with the gentle wisdom of nature.

The National Day of Racial Healing was established in 2017 as an annual convening of activists, artists, healers, changemakers, and community members that come together for dialogue and action towards much needed and long overdue racial healing in this nation.

 

Part 2: Emergent Strategy Ideation Workshop

Our second part of the 2021 National Day of Racial Healing focuses on the reciprocation and exchange of wisdom. This interactive workshop will introduce concepts from adrienne maree brown's book, Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds. Participants will learn the principles that allow us to harness the power of change: adaptation, interdependence, collaborative ideation, transformative justice, and resilience through decentralization. This session will be dynamic and responsive while engaging bravery and conflict generatively. By exploring vulnerability and imagination practices, we can begin to create a future — beyond competition, binaries, linear, and short-term outcomes — and strengthen our commitment to a world that can hold each of us in a state of care, skill, and grace.

 

Speaker

PG Watkins

(they/them)

Paige PG Watkins is a nonbinary organizer, facilitator and organizational strategist from Detroit. PG believes that organizing and storytelling are interconnected and is committed to using both mediums to shift dominant oppressive narratives and change the material conditions of Black people in Detroit and beyond. Their experience with organizational development, grassroots organizing and facilitating intergenerational healing and visionary spaces has given them the tools to lead Black Bottom Archives (BBA) through a collaborative strategic planning process and create goals and priorities that will sustain BBA’s work and the legacy of Black Detroiters across time. PG Watkins is a founding member of Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100)’s Detroit chapter and a board member of the James & Grace Lee Boggs Center.

 

Part 1: Keepers of Ancestral Medicine Panel

Tuesday, January 19 | 10:00am - 11:30am

Learn More >>>

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and SDG members and eligible non-members

Registration
Register online 
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact Monica Banks at [email protected].

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require an accommodation to participate in this activity, please contact Monica Banks at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event type 
Event

Keepers of Ancestral Medicine Panel

Tuesday, January 19, 2021
10:00am - 11:30am

Join SCG on the 2021 National Day of Racial Healing for a virtual experience centering and uplifting the practices and knowledge of Black femmes. Lively conversations and workshops will guide us to remember, reciprocate, and reconnect with the gentle wisdom of nature.

The National Day of Racial Healing was established in 2017 as an annual convening of activists, artists, healers, changemakers, and community members that come together for dialogue and action towards much needed and long overdue racial healing in this nation.

 

Part 1: Keepers of Ancestral Medicine

We start the 2021 National Day of Racial Healing by remembering the experiences and answers already present in our traditions and lineages. Three Black and Afro-Indigenous healers will highlight what it means to remember, reclaim, actively integrate, and sustain ancestral medicine as crucial components to racial healing. Each facilitator will share their rituals of practicing plant medicine and answer questions from participants.

 

Speakers

Jordi

Jordi is a non-conforming, afrofuturistic, multidimensional artist weaving healing energy for the self and the community. Her practice is deeply rooted in a celestial connection to the other-wordly. Through performance encompassing vocal, theatre, storytelling, and dance, Jordi processes human and non-human emotions, growth, trauma, and the emergence of authentic selfhoods. Her healing practices are deeply involved with local activism of Los Angeles’s QTBIPOC (queer, trans, Black, Indiginous and persons of colour) communities. Her work has been presented in Canada, New York film festivals, and the Getty Museum on Tongva Land. She is currently creating a new audio work entitled "Glossolalia."

Ayo Ngozi Drayton

Ayo Ngozi Drayton is a believer in ancestral tradition, a documentarian of Black herbal and cultural practices, and a community worker. Trained as a clinical herbalist, she is a beloved instructor at several community herbal schools and conferences. Ayo also owns The Creative Root,  LLC (a small herbal business), and coordinates Planting Reparations, a reparations-based mutual aid initiative that redistributes plants and healing resources to Black people. In addition to education received through mentorship, Ayo holds a BA in Journalism from Hampton University, an MPS in African and African American Studies from Cornell University, and an MS in Herbal Medicine from the Maryland University of Integrative Health. Ayo is based on Mashpee Wampanoag territory (New Bedford, Massachusetts).

Sade Musa 

Sade Musa is the founder of ROOTS OF RESISTANCE, an educational project that seeks to help folks reclaim healing ways interrupted by colonization, to disrupt narratives which invisibilize Afro-diasporic contributions to medicine, and bring attention to health disparities and other forms of health injustice. ROR operates under the belief that bodily autonomy and culturally relevant medical care are essential, and that learning to heal ourselves is a liberatory praxis of self-determination and resistance. ROR is dedicated to helping historically looted communities advocate for their wellbeing, access quality healthcare, and to find alternatives if western healing models fail them. Through ROR she offers donation-based and sliding scale community herbal classes and consultation, leads plant walks, operates an apothecary, and donates medicine to various grassroots wellness programs."

Part 2: Emergent Strategy Ideation Workshop

Tuesday, January 19 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm

Learn More >>>


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Anyone

Registration
Register online 
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact Monica Banks at [email protected].

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require an accommodation to participate in this activity, please contact Monica Banks at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event type 
Event

The Ethos of Being Trust-Based Session 2: Interpersonal Skills: The Hardest Skill Building You'll Ever Do

Tuesday, January 12, 2021
10:00am - 11:30am

About the Series

The Ethos of Being Trust-Based, developed by Trust-Based Philanthropy Project, Philanthropy CA, and Grantmakers for Effective Organizations, is a webinar series dedicated to exploring the fundamental values and dispositions central to a trust-based approach. At the heart of this work is a deep focus on building trust and relationships at every level, both internally and externally. This requires constant self-examination, a cultivation of interpersonal skills, a willingness to reimagine and adjust organizational practices, and an understanding of the greater systemic factors that have given way to the institution of philanthropy as a whole. It requires that we see and name how racial inequities have been perpetuated in our institutions, behaviors, and practices, even as we strive to alleviate them. Trust-based philanthropy invites us to understand and take action on these ideas at the personal, interpersonal, organizational, and systemic levels in order to interrupt the perpetuation of power imbalances in our sector.

Between the global pandemic and this country’s racial reckoning, our interconnectedness, and inequalities, have never been clearer. From this reality, how can we cultivate trust-based dispositions that support mutuality throughout crisis response, and beyond? 

  • How can we seize the potential for redistribution of power, especially to benefit communities that have been systematically oppressed? 

  • How might we fully embody partnership in a spirit of service? 

  • What context is essential for us to understand? 

  • What behaviors do we need to un-learn? 

  • And can we embrace and sustain self-reflection and generative listening as must-have tools for transformation? 

Join the Trust-Based Philanthropy Project, Philanthropy California, and GEO as we explore these questions and examine the aspects of trust-building essential for a strong and healthy ecosystem at all levels: individually, interpersonally, inter-organizationally, and systemically. Each webinar will: 1) feature seasoned perspectives on some of the overarching concepts related to trust-based values and dispositions; 2) include stories and lessons from funders who try to live and breathe relational values; and, 3) offer space for small group reflection on how to cultivate what’s required to embed a trust-based ethos in our philanthropic practice.

 

About Session 2: Interpersonal Skills —— The Hardest Skill-Building You’ll Ever Do

In philanthropy, we sometimes overlook or deprioritize the interpersonal skills required to do this work well. This includes the ability to connect dots, show up in an emotionally intelligent way, listen actively and empathically, and know when to get out of the way. It also requires a clear understanding of power, and how power imbalances between funders and grantee partners are exacerbated by race, gender, and class inequities. Cultivating and advancing effective interpersonal skills requires practitioners to bring self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy, and willingness to take multiple perspectives into account. In this workshop, we’ll:

  • Examine the context of philanthropy with regards to relationship building
  • Build capacity to listen well
  • Explore practices that help to cultivate empathy and compassion
  • Build self-awareness around power, privilege, and navigating across differences
  • Explore practices around transparent communication and managing discomfort

 

Moderator

Kate Seely, Northern California Grantmakers

 

Speakers

Chris Murchison, Organizational Culture Consultant & Coach

John Esterle, Co-Executive Director, The Whitman Institute

Angel Roberson Daniels, Executive Director, Angell Foundation

Ellen Friedman, Executive Director, Compton Foundation

 

Other Sessions

Session 3: Building Trust Begins at Home — Practices That Advance or Weaken Trust in Your Organization >>> Learn More

Tuesday, February 23 | 10:00am - 11:30am

 

Session 4: Confronting and Correcting Historical Power Imbalances >>> Learn More

Tuesday, March 30 | 10:00am - 11:30am

 

Session 5: Reimagining Funder Roles in a Trust-Based Context >>> Learn More

Tuesday, April 27 | 10:00am - 11:30am 

 

Presented in partnership with:


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online.
NCG & Catalyst members: Register online.
Non-members: Register online.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event type 
Event

We're Just Getting Started! 2020 Post-Election Debrief with Movement Leaders

Monday, December 14, 2020
2:00pm - 3:15pm

Last month, California voters made history by passing several propositions and measures to restore rights and self-determination to communities impacted by incarceration, while also rejecting racist legislation that would have rolled back decades of progress in the movement against prisons and policing.

Join us for a post-election debrief with grassroots organizers who led us to these victories by building power in communities throughout the state. We will hear about the historic passing of Proposition 17, which will restore voting rights to people impacted by incarceration; how the defeat of Proposition 25 allows us to fight for real pretrial justice, what is on the horizon in Los Angeles County with the passing of Measure J and new District Attorney George Gascón and more. Don’t miss out on this incredible opportunity to be in partnership and dialogue with these amazing movement leaders!

 

Speakers

  • Eunisses Hernandez, La Defensa
  • Gina Clayton Johnson, Essie Justice Project
  • Brian Kaneda, Californians United for a Responsible Budget
  • Roger Perez, Roy & Patricia Disney Family Foundation (moderator)
  • Taina Vargas, Initiate Justice

Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and SDG members

Registration
SCG members: Register online here
NCG & SDG members: here
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event type 

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