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2018 Annual Conference: "Our Common Humanity"

In this time of deep division about the crucial challenges facing our communities and our country, #SCGAnnualCon18 is where you and your fellow SoCal philanthropy leaders come together for cutting-edge learning and deep connection. Please join us for a day of impact and inspiration as we explore what gives us hope, powers our work and binds us all together: Our Common Humanity.

SCG’s Annual Conference is the region’s premier convening for the philanthropy sector, bringing together more than 600 of your peers from family and private foundations, corporate giving and government funders. It’s your best opportunity of the year to build your network, discover new strategies you can use in your grantmaking and connect what you do every day to critical, timely issues in the news.

We’ll learn from nationally recognized experts and from each other in a full day of dynamic, interactive sessions organized around three main tracks:

  • Advancing Racial Equity, Diversity and Inclusion
  • Developing Professional Skills
  • Engaging in Effective Collaboration and Partnerships

You’ll leave with powerful ideas and tools to advance your work and lead real change with partners in our sector and beyond.

More than ever, we in the philanthropic sector are called upon to make bold investments that can create a more inclusive society. Now is the time to take our work to the next level, using our grantmaking, our voice and our collaborative power to create deep change for the communities we serve. We hope you’ll be part of Our Common Humanity on September 17th.

More speakers to be announced!

                                                                                                                                                               *Times Subject to Change

7:30 am

Check-In Opens

8:00 am

Networking Breakfast

8:30 am

Welcoming Remarks, State of SCG and Members Meeting

Beatriz Solís, Chair, Board of Directors, Southern California Grantmakers; Director, Healthy Communities (South Region), The California Endowment

Christine Essel, President and CEO, Southern California Grantmakers

9:00 am

Our Common Humanity: A Conversation with john a. powell and Fred Ali

Our country is being more deeply divided politically and culturally than it has been in decades. Attacks are increasing against the values and structures that should be undergirding our democracy. Most of us believe we are bound by our common humanity, but are we practicing what it takes to ensure that belief is real and robust? The philanthropic sector can draw on the reality of our interdependence in order to effect positive change in our communities and around the world. But is our sector ready to act with conviction to strengthen the institutions that should be creating equitable access for all rather than excluding and denying the basic humanity of some? And do we in philanthropy truly share an understanding of why confronting―and ultimately solving―issues such as extreme inequality, mass incarceration, climate change and many others will require us to directly address race and racism in our nation? These are fundamental questions that arise when we say that we are focusing on equity.

After john powell’s opening presentation, he will be joined by Fred Ali, President and CEO of the Weingart Foundation. The two will engage in dialogue about the need and potential for philanthropy to play a leadership role in supporting strategies that create solutions to actively build a more inclusive society for a shared future.

john a. powell, Director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society; Robert D. Haas Chancellor’s Chair in Equity and Inclusion; Professor of Law, African American and Ethnic Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Interviewed by Fred Ali, President and CEO, Weingart Foundation

10:00 am

Break

10:30 am

Morning Breakout Sessions

 

  • College (un)Affordability: Addressing Food and Housing Insecurity Among College Students
  • Companion Session: Workshop with Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE)
  • Prioritizing Authentic Engagement to Create Meaningful Change
  • See our Sessions page for more.

12:00 pm

Luncheon Plenary: Adopting a Trauma-Informed Lens in Philanthropy

During this special session, award-winning actor, singer, writer and activist Daniel Beaty will share his childhood story through a personal monologue that looks into experiencing family incarceration, poverty, drug abuse and physical abuse. For years, Daniel battled low self-esteem and depression rooted in his childhood trauma and these experiences shaped his views about the importance of using a trauma-informed lens to address social inequities. He soon discovered the power of the arts to help heal childhood trauma, transform that pain into power and inspire a new generation of change agents to dismantle the systematic racism and oppression at the core of the challenges Daniel, his father, brother, students and so many Americans face. Following his monologue, Daniel will be joined by Judy Belk, President and CEO of The California Wellness Foundation, and Martine Singer, President and CEO of Children's Institute, to discuss how trauma-informed solutions can support philanthropic efforts in health, education, criminal justice, housing and the arts.

Daniel Beaty, Founder, I Dream

Martine Singer, President and CEO, Children's Institute, Inc.

Moderated by Judy Belk, President and CEO, The California Wellness Foundation

1:30 pm

Break

2:00 pm

Afternoon Breakout Sessions

 

  • Companion Session: How Trauma Is Rooted in Racial Inequities and Poverty
  • Funder Collaboratives for Local and National Change
  • Understanding Race and Culture to Improve Educational Outcomes
  • See our Sessions page for more.

3:30 pm

Break

3:45 pm

Closing Plenary: Is it Time for a New American Social Compact?

 
Recent national events, from Charlottesville to the #MeToo movement, have called into question who we are as Americans, and who has the opportunity to access the “American Dream”. As two narratives—one of exclusion or othering, and one of inclusion or belonging—compete to capture the hearts and minds of our country, our collective health, safety and well-being hang in the balance. While one narrative seeks to dehumanize and characterize certain groups as undeserving of the full benefits of society, stoking fear and anxiety about the future, the other seeks to broaden the circle of who is eligible for society’s full benefits. Just watch the 24-hour news channels to see how these narratives—and the policies they lend themselves to—play out in real time, tearing down our collective commitment to our common humanity.
 
Public health research has shown that countries with the strongest social compacts have the best health. Sadly, our social compact is steadily eroding, with the threats against it more severe than any time in recent history, leaving many among us without the basic tools needed to achieve the "American Dream". In this moment of profound tension, is it time to recommit to a new set of core inclusive values that builds on our past and embraces our future?
 
This session will explore how we can create and commit to a new American social compact that unites our commitment to care for each other and our planet. Our panelists—spanning the business, labor and philanthropic sectors—will consider how this new set of values can lead to practices that both help us heal from the destructive legacy of exclusion and that create inclusive pathways for opportunity and prosperity for all of us linked by our common humanity.
 

Saru Jayaraman, Co-Founder and President, Restaurant Opportunities Centers United (ROC United); Director, Food Labor Research Center, University of California, Berkeley

Maria S. Salinas, President and CEO, Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce

Edgar Villanueva, Vice President of Programs and Advocacy, Schott Foundation for Public Education

Moderated by Robert K. Ross, M.D., President and CEO, The California Endowment

4:30 pm

Cocktail Hour

5:30 pm

Adjourn

The attendee roster is restricted to members of the SCG and conference registrants. Please login to view it.

 

InterContinental Hotel Downtown Los Angeles

900 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90017
Vehicle entry on 7th St. between Figueroa and Francisco. 

Front Desk: +1 (213) 688‑7777
Website: dtla.intercontinental.com

Directions

Parking Information

Valet parking is available at the Intercontinental at a discounted rate of $20 per vehicle. It can be accessed on 7th Street, between Figueroa & Francisco. Once your vehicle has been dropped off, proceed to the EVENTS door entrance.

Registration is located on the 5th floor of the hotel in the Wilshire Garden Foyer.

Self-parking is available at The Bloc located at 700 S. Flower Street. Parking rates are $2.75 for every 10 minutes ($35 maximum rate). Early Bird rates offered from 6:00 am – 9:00 am for a $8 flat fee.

 

Public Transportation

The closest metro stop is 7th St / Metro Center. Use the exit on Figueroa & 7th Street and walk about 1 minute to the hotel. Click here or the image below to download the full Metro map.

Discounted Room Rate

Rooms are available from September 16, 2018 – September 17, 2018 at a rate of $269 per night plus tax.

Click Here to book your room

The deadline to book your room is Friday, August 24th.

 

Plenary Sessions

Our Common Humanity: A Conversation with john a. powell and Fred Ali

Our country is being more deeply divided politically and culturally than it has been in decades. Attacks are increasing against the values and structures that should be undergirding our democracy. Most of us believe we are bound by our common humanity, but are we practicing what it takes to ensure that belief is real and robust? The philanthropic sector can draw on the reality of our interdependence in order to effect positive change in our communities and around the world. But is our sector ready to act with conviction to strengthen the institutions that should be creating equitable access for all rather than excluding and denying the basic humanity of some? And do we in philanthropy truly share an understanding of why confronting―and ultimately solving―issues such as extreme inequality, mass incarceration, climate change and many others will require us to directly address race and racism in our nation? These are fundamental questions that arise when we say that we are focusing on equity.

After john powell’s opening presentation, he will be joined by Fred Ali, President and CEO of the Weingart Foundation. The two will engage in dialogue about the need and potential for philanthropy to play a leadership role in supporting strategies that create solutions to actively build a more inclusive society for a shared future.

john a. powell, Director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society; Robert D. Haas Chancellor’s Chair in Equity and Inclusion; Professor of Law, African American and Ethnic Studies, University of California, Berkeley

  Interviewed by Fred Ali, President and CEO, Weingart
  Foundation

Luncheon Plenary: Adopting a Trauma-Informed Lens in Philanthropy

During this special session, award-winning actor, singer, writer and activist Daniel Beaty will share his childhood story through a personal monologue that looks into experiencing family incarceration, poverty, drug abuse and physical abuse. For years, Daniel battled low self-esteem and depression rooted in his childhood trauma and these experiences shaped his views about the importance of using a trauma-informed lens to address social inequities. He soon discovered the power of the arts to help heal childhood trauma, transform that pain into power and inspire a new generation of change agents to dismantle the systematic racism and oppression at the core of the challenges Daniel, his father, brother, students and so many Americans face. Following his monologue, Daniel will be joined by Judy Belk, President and CEO of The California Wellness Foundation, and Martine Singer, President and CEO of Children's Institute, to discuss how trauma-informed solutions can support philanthropic efforts in health, education, criminal justice, housing and the arts.

Daniel Beaty, Founder, I Dream

Martine Singer, President and CEO, Children's Institute, Inc.

  Moderated by Judy Belk, President and CEO, The California
  Wellness Foundation 

Closing Plenary: Is it Time for a New American Social Compact?

Recent national events, from Charlottesville to the #MeToo movement, have called into question who we are as Americans, and who has the opportunity to access the “American Dream”. As two narratives—one of exclusion or othering, and one of inclusion or belonging—compete to capture the hearts and minds of our country, our collective health, safety and well-being hang in the balance. While one narrative seeks to dehumanize and characterize certain groups as undeserving of the full benefits of society, stoking fear and anxiety about the future, the other seeks to broaden the circle of who is eligible for society’s full benefits. Just watch the 24-hour news channels to see how these narratives—and the policies they lend themselves to—play out in real time, tearing down our collective commitment to our common humanity.
 
Public health research has shown that countries with the strongest social compacts have the best health. Sadly, our social compact is steadily eroding, with the threats against it more severe than any time in recent history, leaving many among us without the basic tools needed to achieve the "American Dream". In this moment of profound tension, is it time to recommit to a new set of core inclusive values that builds on our past and embraces our future?
 
This session will explore how we can create and commit to a new American social compact that unites our commitment to care for each other and our planet. Our panelists—spanning the business, labor and philanthropic sectors—will consider how this new set of values can lead to practices that both help us heal from the destructive legacy of exclusion and that create inclusive pathways for opportunity and prosperity for all of us linked by our common humanity.
 

Saru Jayaraman, Co-Founder and President, Restaurant Opportunities Centers United (ROC United); Director, Food Labor Research Center, University of California, Berkeley

Maria S. Salinas, President and CEO, Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce

Edgar Villanueva, Vice President of Programs and Advocacy, Schott Foundation for Public Education

Moderated by Robert K. Ross, M.D., President and CEO, The California Endowment

Breakout Sessions

College (un)Affordability: Addressing Food and Housing Insecurity Among College Students

According to a first-of-its-kind survey released earlier this year by researchers at Temple University and the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, 36 percent of students at 66 surveyed colleges and universities do not get enough to eat, and a similar number lack a secure place to live. Join this conversation to learn about this growing problem and how philanthropy can effectively support efforts to address students’ basic needs to promote degree completion. This session will look at the new economics of college confronting today’s students; what we know about basic needs insecurity on college campuses; approaches that funders can take to help alleviate the college affordability crisis; and local efforts addressing this important issue.

John E. Kobara, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, California Community Foundation

Sara Goldrick-Rab, Professor of Higher Education Policy and Sociology, Temple University; Founder, Wisconsin HOPE Lab

Companion Session: How Trauma Is Rooted in Racial Inequities and Poverty

“What happened to you?” This simple question can unlock experiences of adversity that can make individuals more susceptible to a number of poorer outcomes such as physical and mental health issues, learning and behavior issues, lower academic performance and shorter overall life expectancy. We now know that where we live can affect our lives and can be explained in large part by differences in race, ethnicity and socioeconomic factors such as income, education and employment status. But until now, we haven’t explored the intersections of race, income and trauma. Join the panelists for a deep dive conversation on how trauma is rooted in racial inequities and poverty and how trauma-informed solutions can address the root causes.

Alex Briscoe, Principal, The California Children's Trust

  Edward Muna, Data Analyst, Program for Environmental and
  Regional Equity (PERE); Center for the Study of Immigrant
  Integration, University of Southern California

John Ott, Co-Founder, Center for Collective Wisdom

Companion Session: Applying a Racial Justice Lens to Grantmaking

Join this interactive workshop designed by the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE) to build on the issues raised in the opening plenary with john a. powell. Participants will explore how to recognize how "othering and belonging" and structural racialization are playing out in grantmaking—and how we can address those dynamics through grantmaking. We’ll also discuss how funders can make grantmaking shifts that build a greater collective voice without denying the differences in situational power, access and influence. Participants will learn the nuanced skills they need to build to move beyond platitudes to practices that are truly advancing racial equity and justice, and that deepen our shared commitment to an inclusive and racially just society.

john a. powell, Director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society; Robert D. Haas Chancellor’s Chair in Equity and Inclusion; Professor of Law, African American and Ethnic Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Lori Villarosa, Founder and Executive Director, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE)

Maisie Chin, Executive Director and Co-Founder, CADRE

Does Your Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Include Individuals with Disabilities? Deepen Your Impact Without Changing Your Priorities

Individuals with disabilities are often overlooked in conversations about diversity but they must be included in our conversation of our common humanity. Our thinking can expand without the need to increase an organization’s mission or funding mandate. In Southern California, only about one-third of people with disabilities have a job, less than two-thirds graduate from high school and people with disabilities are twice as likely to live in poverty than those without. Given that 1-in-5 people in the U.S. have a disability, it is vital that we come together as a community of funders to think about how our grantmaking includes and supports this underserved segment of our community. Join this session as we explore ways to be responsive to community needs, identify ways to complement existing aspects of a grantmaking portfolio, as well as outline easy steps that allow for more inclusivity within your philanthropic priorities.

 

  Candace Cable, Paralympian; Social Justice Speaker and Activist; 
  Open Doors Access Inclusion Trainer; Disability Consultant, LA2028

Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi, Co-Founder, Mizrahi Family Charitable Fund; CEO, RespectAbility

Renata Simril, President and CEO, LA84 Foundation

Moderated by Kym Eisner, Executive Director, Craig H. Neilsen Foundation

Funder Collaboratives for Local and National Change

Working alone, funders might find it difficult to learn about and take action on a variety of important issues. Working together across regions and issues, however, they are more likely to be better equipped to tackle such challenges. Funder collaboratives bring philanthropic entities together in unique ways to learn, connect, co-fund and act on important policy issues. Funders Together to End Homelessness and Funders for Housing and Opportunity help connect local and national dialogues around housing and homelessness, and how they intersect with health, criminal justice and education to provide cross-sector opportunities for greater systems change that advance racial equity.

Amanda Andere, CEO, Funders Together to End Homelessness

Jeanne Fekade-Sellassie, Project Director, Funders for Housing and Opportunity

  Ryan R. Yamamoto, Community Benefit, Kaiser Permanente-Southern
  California Region

Moderated by Bill Pitkin, Director, Domestic Programs, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation; Board Chair, FTEH

Incorporating a Gender Justice Lens in Grantmaking

Despite clear evidence that the well-being of women has a major influence on overall community health, less than four percent of California’s philanthropic dollars are targeted specifically to support women and girls. Even with the recent rise of the #MeToo and Times Up movements, philanthropy continues to struggle with committing to advance gender justice in its work. So how can funders collectively support a transition―internally in our sector and externally through our grantmaking―to bring gender justice to the forefront of grantmaking? Join our panel of cross-sector leaders to discuss the key issues, needs and opportunities facing women and girls, inclusive of all sexual orientations and gender identities. Panelists will share the latest research, as well as grantmaking strategies and tools to help philanthropists incorporate a gender justice lens holistically into everyday work.

  Surina Khan, CEO, The Women's Foundation of California

  Moderated by Abbe Land, Executive Director, LA County
  Women and Girls Initiative

More speakers to be announced.

Philanthropic Strategies to Open Pathways for Economic Inclusion

Grantmaking strategies for economic inclusion can be powerful tools to help working families achieve economic security. Significant research has been done about underlying wealth that helps build and sustain communities over time, from entrepreneurship to homeownership. How can philanthropy play a role in tackling economic inclusion, seemingly rife with complexity and obstacles? Funders interested in positive health and educational outcomes may see strong ties to home ownership. For example, homeownership builds wealth (adding to a household’s total net worth by an average of $13,700), reduces high-school dropout rates and correlates with lower probability of depression in children compared to children of renters. Meanwhile, entrepreneurship can increase wealth and help bridge the racial wealth gap. But what happens when a person of color who owns a business retires? What happens to their employees and the services that business provides to a community? Join us for a discussion on how changemakers are working to help build wealth through a range of initiatives, including building long-term power through shared community land ownership, homeownership and sustainable entrepreneurship.

 

James Alva, Senior Vice President & Market Manager (Southern CA), Citi Community Development

 

 

 

More speakers to be announced.

Prioritizing Authentic Engagement to Create Meaningful Change

Participatory grantmaking and deep listening lead to better grantmaking strategy. When nonprofits and communities participate in philanthropic processes, it leads to better practices, more authentic discussions and improved outcomes for everyone involved. But involving nonprofits in the process of grantmaking is challenging because it requires confronting the status quo and examining barriers that prevent authentic participation, including power dynamics, internal processes and organizational culture.

In this session, Grantmakers for Effective Organizations will share the benefits of building authentic relationships with nonprofits and community members and offer several tools and key questions that can guide a participatory approach to philanthropy. Participants will also hear how the Social Equity Collaborative Fund at San Diego Grantmakers has experimented with bringing their grants closer to the community.

Kristen Scott Kennedy, Director, Office of the President, Grantmakers for Effective Organizations

Megan Thomas, Vice President of Collaboration and Special Initiatives, San Diego Grantmakers

The Hidden Biases of Good People: Implications for Philanthropy, Non-Profit Organizations and the Communities They Serve

Implicit bias is everywhere and affects everyone to varying degrees. Broadly speaking, it involves varying degrees of stereotyping, prejudice and/or discrimination below conscious awareness in a manner that typically benefits oneself or one’s group; it involves limited or distorted perceptions of others. We all have biases. The biases held by police officers, physicians, prosecutors and criminal court judges can literally determine whether someone lives or dies. Biases held by teachers and school administrators affect educational practices and student outcomes. And for our sector, implicit biases can affect the priorities set and supported by philanthropic and non-profit organizations. Dr. Marks’ engaging and interactive workshop will not only provide a clear description of implicit bias, it will also describe its causes, consequences, measurement, potential solutions and implications for philanthropic and non-profit organizations.

Dr. Bryant T. Marks, Sr., Chief Equity Officer, National Training Institute on Race and Equity

Understanding Race and Culture to Improve Educational Outcomes

When it comes to educating our children, opportunity and outcome gaps continue to plague students of color and those from different cultural backgrounds, including English-language learners. Addressing this inequity is messy, complicated and sensitive. This session will present research centered on the understanding that racial literacy and cultural competence are important components to improving educational outcomes. Our speakers will discuss strategies that grantmakers can take to address this problem, including supporting teacher development, engaging in public policy and advocacy efforts and other promising practices.

Tyrone Howard, Professor, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies; Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion; Director and Founder, Black Male Institute, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)

Nike Irvin, Board of Directors, Riordan Foundation; Vice-Chair, Board of Directors, Southern California Grantmakers

Alberto Retana, President and CEO, Community Coalition

Using Your Investment Portfolio to Amplify Impact and Champion Systems Change

Because foundations hold a dual responsibility for stewarding an effective grants program and managing investment assets to get the highest return, aligning both tasks to maximize the foundation’s impact is a growing trend. Given that the ultimate aim of a foundation is to impact positive change for the populations they seek to help, more foundations are considering how their endowments can not only maximize return but also be a leverage point in driving systems change and impact. At this session, experts in impact investment management will discuss the process, challenges and benefits of impact and program related investments. They will discuss why it is critical to know exactly where your foundation is invested and how you can make the “divest or engage” decision for holdings that seem in conflict with your organization’s stated values and mission.

Fred Ali, President and CEO, Weingart Foundation

Tina Castro, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Avivar Capital

Dr. Stephanie Gripne, Founder and Executive Director, Impact Finance Center

Amir Kirkwood, First Vice President, Commercial Banking, Amalgamated Bank

Evan L. Mizrachy, CFA, CAIA, Senior Client Relationship Manager, Aperio Group

More speakers to be announced!

 

Fred Ali

President and CEO, Weingart Foundation

James Alva

Senior Vice President & Market Manager (Southern CA), Citi Community Development

Amanda Andere

CEO, Funders Together to End Homelessness

Daniel Beaty

Founder, I Dream

Judy Belk

President and CEO, The California Wellness Foundation

Alex Briscoe

Principal, The California Children's Trust

Candace Cable

Paralympian; Social Justice Speaker and Activist; Open Doors Access Inclusion Trainer; Disability Consultant, LA2028

Tina Castro

Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Avivar Capital

Maisie Chin

Executive Director and Co-Founder, CADRE

Kym Eisner

Executive Director, Craig H. Neilsen Foundation

Christine Essel

President and CEO, Southern California Grantmakers

Jeanne Fekade-Sellassie

Project Director, Funders for Housing and Opportunity

Sara Goldrick-Rab

Professor of Higher Education Policy and Sociology, Temple University; Founder, Wisconsin HOPE Lab

Dr. Stephanie Gripne

Founder and Executive Director, Impact Finance Center

Tyrone Howard

Professor, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies; Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion; Director and Founder, Black Male Institute, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)

Nike Irvin

Board of Directors, Riordan Foundation; Vice-Chair, Board of Directors, Southern California Grantmakers

Saru Jayaraman

Co-Founder and President, Restaurant Opportunities Centers United (ROC United); Director, Food Labor Research Center, University of California, Berkeley

Cinny Kennard

Executive Director, Annenberg Foundation

Surina Khan

CEO, The Women's Foundation of California

Amir Kirkwood

First Vice President, Commercial Banking, Amalgamated Bank

John E. Kobara

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, California Community Foundation

Abbe Land

Executive Director, LA County Women and Girls Initiative

Dr. Bryant T. Marks, Sr.

Chief Equity Officer, National Training Institute on Race and Equity

Evan L. Mizrachy, CFA, CAIA

Senior Client Relationship Manager, Aperio Group

Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi

Co-Founder, Mizrahi Family Charitable Fund; CEO, RespectAbility

Edward Muna

Data Analyst, Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE); Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, University of Southern California

John Ott

Co-Founder, Center for Collective Wisdom

Bill Pitkin

Director, Domestic Programs, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation; Board Chair, FTEH

john a. powell

Director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society; Robert D. Haas Chancellor’s Chair in Equity and Inclusion; Professor of Law, African American and Ethnic Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Alberto Retana

President and CEO, Community Coalition

Robert K. Ross, M.D.

President and CEO, The California Endowment

Maria S. Salinas

President and CEO, Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce

Kristen Scott Kennedy

Director, Office of the President, Grantmakers for Effective Organizations

Renata Simril

President and CEO, LA84 Foundation

Martine Singer

President and CEO, Children's Institute, Inc.

Beatriz Solís

Chair, Board of Directors, Southern California Grantmakers; Director, Healthy Communities (South Region), The California Endowment

Megan Thomas

Vice President of Collaboration and Special Initiatives, San Diego Grantmakers

Edgar Villanueva

Vice President of Programs and Advocacy, Schott Foundation for Public Education

Lori Villarosa

Founder and Executive Director, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE)

Ryan R. Yamamoto

Community Benefit, Kaiser Permanente-Southern California Region

   

      

 

 
 
 
 
        

 

                                     

    

                                       

                             

      

                                       

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

                   

 

                      

                              

 

 

                           

 

                 

 

         

 

 

 

 

                                             

                                         

 

                                     

      

 

                 

 

For information about sponsorship opportunities, click here or contact Amanda Byrd at
[email protected] or (213) 680-8866 ext. 226.

When: 
Monday, September 17, 2018
7:30am - 5:30pm PDT
Where: 
InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown
900 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90017
Fee: 
Members: $400.00 (please log in to register)
Non-Members: $900.00
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Fees

Early bird registration deadline is August 20, 2018
$400 for SCG members registered by August 20
$475 for SCG members registered after August 20
$900 for non-members who meet SCG eligibility criteria.

Members of Northern California Grantmakers and San Diego Grantmakers can register at the SCG member rate. Contact us for more information.

Who May Attend

Current SCG, NCG and SDG members and others eligible for membership. Space is limited.

Registration

Please register by clicking the "REGISTER NOW" button to the right.

SCG Members: You must log in to your SCG account to register.
NCG and SDG Members: Contact us for more information.
Eligible Non-Members: If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.

Sponsors: Please contact Rachel Doria at [email protected] to register.

Accomodations for People with Disabilities

If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this event, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Questions?

Please contact us.

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