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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & PUBLIC SAFETY

Event

Incarcerated Firefighters: At the Intersection of Abolition, Workforce Development, and Wildfire Resilience

Wednesday, July 28, 2021
10:00am - 11:30am

As California wildfires devastate communities throughout the state, significant financial, material and human resources are deployed to support recovery and reduce their threats on communities. Despite the well-publicized socioeconomic and health impacts of wildfires and philanthropic support, little attention is paid to the experience and needs of incarcerated firefighters. Incarcerated firefighters risk their lives to protect Californians while simultaneously experiencing the racism and oppression of imprisonment and criminalization. At the height of last year’s historic wildfire season, many trained, incarcerated firefighters were sidelined from the state’s firefighting efforts due to closures of prison firefighting camps as a result of COVID-19 outbreaks. Furthermore, many incarcerated firefighters are paid minimally for working in dangerous conditions and are unable to use their skills to obtain municipal firefighting careers upon their release due to their criminal records.

 

Join us to

Hear from formerly incarcerated firefighters and impacted community members who are working at the intersections of racial equity, prison industrial complex abolition, workforce development, and wildfire resilience. Speakers will discuss important topics, including:

The use of prison labor to address the state’s workforce shortage to combat wildfires and the barriers to sustainable workforce development post-release

  • The experience of firefighting while in prison and the role and current status of prison fire camps.
  • The need to remove barriers to employment and support for incarcerated people to re-enter communities.
  • Philanthropy’s role in advocating to end involuntary servitude as punishment and support organizations at the frontline in addressing these intersectional challenges.

 

Moderator

Romarilyn Ralston, Program Director, Project Rebound, California State University - Fullerton 

Romarilyn Ralston is the Program Director of Project Rebound at Cal State Fullerton and the Co-Chair of the CSU Project Rebound Consortium Policy and Advocacy Committee. A black feminist prison abolitionist scholar working to interrupt criminalization at the intersections of race, gender, and education, Ralston earned a Bachelor’s degree in Gender & Feminist Studies from Pitzer College and a Master’s degree in Liberal Arts from Washington University in St. Louis. She is the recipient of Pitzer College’s 2020 Distinguished Alumni Award, California State Senator Ling Ling Chang’s 2020 Woman of Distinction Social Justice Champion Award, and the 2018 Civil Rights and Advocacy Award from the Orange County Chapter of the National Council of 100 Black Women. Ralston was a 2018 Fellow of the Women's Policy Institute, whereas a member of the criminal justice reform team she helped to pass several pieces of legislation into law. Ralston has also held fellowships with Just Leadership USA, CORO Public Affairs, and the Napier Initiative for Justice and Peace.

 

Speakers

George Galvis, Executive Director, Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice (CURYJ)

George Galvis has promoted restorative justice and healing to transform lives. He draws from personal experience and his indigenous roots to help young people, particularly those involved in the criminal justice system, become community leaders for positive change. Galvis advocates for at-risk youth, prisoners, and formerly imprisoned individuals with children. As a board member of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, Galvis helped create All of Us or None, which fights for the rights of formerly and currently incarcerated people and families. He has led statewide advocacy efforts to transform punitive school and juvenile justice policies that disparately impact youth of color and has developed traditional rites of passage programs as healthy alternatives to gang violence. He also serves as the co-Director of the California Alliance for Youth and Community Justice (CAYCJ), a broad coalition working collectively to end youth incarceration, youth treatment as adults, and build community capacity for alternatives to incarceration that empower young people in California.

 

Amika Mota, Policy Director, Young Women’s Freedom Center

Amika began organizing for Reproductive Justice and young mothers’ rights over twenty years ago, as a teen mama and midwife. Her passion for criminal justice reform is rooted in her own experience. She began advocating for women in prison during her seven-year incarceration in the California Department of Corrections, where she served time at both CIW and CCWF. During her time inside, she was a jailhouse lawyer, paralegal, firefighter, and mentor to many young folks in the yard. The sisterhood and resilience of the women on the inside are what motivate her to revolutionize the criminal justice system, transform what true rehabilitation and reentry look like, and promote a culture of healing and restorative justice to those most impacted by the system. She is committed to lifting up the voices, visibility, and leadership of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women.

Brandon Smith, Executive Director, Forestry & Fire Recruitment Program (FFRP)

Brandon Smith is the Executive Director of The Forestry and Fire Recruitment Program (FFRP), a nonprofit organization helping those in California’s Fire Camps obtain gainful employment once released. After being incarcerated in California’s Fire Camps and responding to all hazardous risks, Brandon found a way to transition into a professional wildland firefighter career post-release. Since then he has been an advocate for criminal justice and environmental reform. Brandon worked six years (both in and out of fire camp) as a wildland firefighter and forestry technician. He attended the University of California- Berkeley and the Victor Valley Colleges Wildland Academy. He has been advocating for and supporting the fire camp population since 2014.

Presented in partnership with:


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members

Registration
SCG members: Register online here
NCG & Catalyst members: here
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event type 
Event

My Life Is Not A Game: The Movement to Repeal California’s Three Strikes Law

Tuesday, May 25, 2021
10:00am - 11:30am

Join us for a presentation and discussion about the movement to end California’s Three Strikes law. Since 1994, California’s Three Strikes law has exponentially increased the state’s prison population and devastated communities of color and poor people. This brutal law required a minimum sentence of 25 years to life for people with prior felony convictions, even if the third conviction was neither serious nor violent. In 2012, this law was amended stating that for three strikes to be warranted, the third strike had to be serious or violent. However, this amendment did not change the realities of the thousands of people serving lengthy life sentences under the law’s original intent.

During this event, we will hear from the Repeal California’s Three Strikes Law Coalition, a new coalition organized by people directly impacted by the Three Strikes Law, including currently and formerly incarcerated people and loved ones of people serving these draconian sentences. The Repeal California’s Three Strikes Law Coalition will share their bold and necessary vision to remove the three strikes law entirely, reinvest cost savings into impacted communities through education, reentry, victim services, housing, mental health, and workforce development, as well the role funders can play in supporting this movement.

 

Speakers

Anne Irwin

Founder, and Director, Smart Justice California

Anne works to elect and educate policymakers who support meaningful criminal justice reform that promotes safety, fairness, and healthy communities. Anne spearheads Smart Justice’s blended 501c3, 501c4, and electoral engagement strategy for persuading and inspiring California’s elected officials to adopt new approaches to criminalization and incarceration. Anne recently led committees to elect Los Angeles District Attorney George Gascon, Los Angeles County Supervisor Holly Mitchell, and San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin. Anne is also Vice President of the JK Irwin Foundation, a family foundation focused on ending mass incarceration and criminalization. Prior to founding SJCA, Anne was a trial attorney in the San Francisco Public Defender’s Office for many years. Anne is a graduate of Stanford Law School and New York University. She has served on the American Constitution Society, Prison University Project, and Threshold Foundation boards. Anne currently serves on the Board of The Justice Collaborative/The Appeal. Anne was born and raised in San Francisco and is raising her two young daughters there.

John Yahya Johnson

Co-producer, Ear Hustle Podcast

John Yahya Johnson is a co-producer on the Ear Hustle Podcast, a podcast that has largely contributed to advancing the voice of incarcerated people through the power of storytelling, thus helping to broaden the narrative on how incarcerated people are perceived. After being convicted and sentenced to a prison term of 30 years to life under the California three strikes law, he dedicated himself to carceral justice reform, and joined a policy group to confront and change systemic abuses of power through both the legislative and initiative process. Since his release in April 2020, he has continued to be an integral part of the carceral and social justice reform movement by joining the Repeal California Three Strikes Coalition as a campaign consultant to repeal the three-strikes law, and the Stop San Quentin Outbreak Coalition to address the systemic failures of government to effectively preserve the sanctity of life of those incarcerated people impacted by the Covid-19 virus in California’s prisons. John is passionate about carceral and social justice reform because he has firsthand experience having been directly impacted by both.

Zakiya Prince

Campaign Lead, Repeal California’s Three Strikes Law Coalition 

She was born and raised in the Bay Area, CA and is a graduate of California State University, Northridge. Zakiya spent several years working as an educator and social worker but her fierce advocacy for her husband, who was sentenced to 35 years to life under California’s Three Strikes law, led her to the fight to end mass incarceration. As someone impacted by the carceral system, she has dedicated her life to disrupting the school-to-prison pipeline, fighting to end mass incarceration, and empowering people who have been oppressed to fight for the freedoms they deserve. She is currently the Campaign Lead for the Repeal California’s Three Strikes Law Coalition and a Women’s Policy Institute (WPI) Fellow.

Jayda Rasberry

Statewide Membership Coordinator, CURB

Jayda Rasberry is a public figure and organizer from Los Angeles. After being arrested, convicted, and sentenced to prison for 6 years at the age of 18, she knew that her life would be changed forever. In 2014, Jayda’s experiences led her to become an organizer with Dignity and Power Now (DPN), where she learned the importance of base building, accountability, and healing. In 2015, Jayda graduated from Liberty Hill County Commissions Training and studied advocacy within local government structures, including how to serve on city boards and commissions. She flourished at DPN and was promoted to Organizing Director and Deputy Director Of External Relations. She is well known for “Grassroots With Jayda,” a media series created by and for formerly incarcerated people, and beyond. Jayda is a graduate of Women’s Policy Institute and became CURB’s Statewide Membership Coordinator in 2021.

Earlonne Woods 

Co-producer, Co-host, Co-creator of Ear Hustle Podcast

Earlonne born and raised in South Central Los Angeles. In 1997, he was sentenced to 31-years-to-life in prison. While incarcerated, he received his GED, attended Coastline Community College, and completed many vocational trade programs. In November 2018, California Governor Jerry Brown commuted Earlonne’s sentence after 21 years of incarceration. Upon his release, Earlonne was hired by PRX as a full-time producer for Ear Hustle, and he continues to work with Nigel, contributing stories about re-entry.

Presented in partnership with:

 

 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current CCJFG, SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
CCJFG, NCG & Catalyst members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

CCJFG: Closing DJJ the Right Way | Part 2

Wednesday, February 17, 2021
3:00pm - 4:30pm

In September 2020, Governor Newsom signed SB 823, a historic bill that will lead to the closure of California’s Division of Juvenile Justice. The legislature is currently working on the development of the Office of Youth and Community Restoration is currently guiding each of California’s 58 counties to develop rehabilitative and healing programs that are alternatives to youth imprisonment, while also allocating grants to each county to fund these services.

We want an end to youth imprisonment, however, the implementation of SB 823 poses many complications. While activists, advocates, and directly impacted community members create plans for community-based services and the distribution of resources, the Chief Probation Officers Department and other state actors object to these shifts and are positioning themselves as the entity to control the resources. Meanwhile, prosecutors continue to transfer youth directly into the adult prison—a tactic that negates the intention of SB 823 and the years of organizing it took to get here.

Hear from youth justice organizers across the state currently developing implementation plans for their counties; we will discuss the challenges and needs of organizers, advocates, and people most directly impacted by this legislation.

 

Register for Part 1

Closing DJJ the Right Way: Register >

 

Speakers

We will announce speakers soon.

 

Presented in partnership with:
 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and CCJFG members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & CCJFG members: Register online (you must log into your account to register).
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

CCJFG: Closing DJJ the Right Way | Part 1

Monday, February 8, 2021
1:00pm - 2:30pm

In September 2020, Governor Newsom signed SB 823, a historic bill that will lead to the closure of California’s Division of Juvenile Justice. Legislature is currently working on the development of the Office of Youth and Community Restoration (OYCR) which will be the agency responsible for overseeing local youth justice systems. OYCR will also be responsible for ensuring that each of California’s 58 counties develop rehabilitative and healing programs that keep youth in their communities while also allocating grants to each county to fund these services. 

We want an end to youth imprisonment, however, the implementation of SB 823 poses many challenges. In order to ensure effective implementation of this legislation, each County is required to convene a subcommittee of system stakeholders and at least three community representatives. In many counties these subcommittees are far from being developed and in some, community representatives are being handpicked. Furthermore, the Chief Probation Officers of California, who were opposed to SB 823, are positioning themselves to control the plans for facilities and placement and funding. Meanwhile, prosecutors continue to transfer youth directly into the adult prison—a tactic that negates the intention of SB 823 and the years of organizing it took to get here. 

Join us for a two-part series to learn more about SB 823 and what is happening right now to ensure that the community gains control of the transformation of California’s youth justice system and how philanthropy can support closing DJJ the right way.

 

Register for Part 2

Closing DJJ the Right Way Webinar Series: Register >

 

Speakers

Frankie Guzman 

Attorney, Director, Youth Justice Initiative

Attorney Francis (“Frankie”) V. Guzman is the Director of the California Youth Justice Initiative at the National Center for Youth Law. Frankie leads a team of attorneys, policy advocates, and community organizers working to eliminate the practice of prosecuting and incarcerating children in California’s adult criminal justice system, reduce incarceration and justice system involvement, and increase developmentally-appropriate services in communities for youth.

Raised in a poor, mostly immigrant community plagued by crime and drugs, Guzman experienced his parents’ divorce and his family’s subsequent homelessness at age 3, the life-imprisonment of his 16-year-old brother at age 5, and lost numerous childhood friends to violence. At age 15, he was arrested for armed robbery and, on his first offense, was sentenced to serve 15 years in the California Youth Authority. Released on parole after six years, Frankie attended law school and became an expert in juvenile law and policy with a focus on ending the prosecution of juveniles as adults.

Through partnerships with community organizations and advocacy groups, Guzman has helped lead California’s effort to reduce the number of youths prosecuted as adults and serving time in adult prisons by passing legislation that established Youth Offender Parole Hearings, reformed Juvenile Transfer Hearings, and eliminated prosecutors’ direct file authority. More recently, Frankie helped lead statewide efforts to eliminate California’s practice of prosecuting 14 and 15-year-olds as adults, prohibit the incarceration of children under age 12 in the juvenile system, and secure approximately $60 million dollars to expand pre-arrest diversion programs and developmentally-appropriate, culturally-relevant community-based services for youth in CA.

Abraham Medina

Convener and Coordinator, California Alliance for Youth and Community Justice

Abraham Medina (he/him) currently serves as the convener, coordinator, and process holder of the California Alliance for Youth and Community Justice (CAYCJ). Prior to that, he served as Executive Director of the National Youth Alliance on Boys and Men of Color (NYABMOC). Abraham left Mexico City when he was seven years old with his mother and younger brother as a result of domestic violence. Abraham and his brother were separated from their mother and crossed the U.S. border experiencing family separation and a form of child detention. Eventually, he reunited with his mother in the U.S. Abraham was undocumented until receiving DACA in 2013 and is in the process of becoming a U.S. Permanent Resident. Abraham grew up an undocumented person of color in the U.S., impacted by and working to transform the school-to-prison-to-deportation pipeline and the justice system as we know it, through Afro-Indigenous concepts, approaches, and models of justice. Due to being undocumented, Abraham was a day laborer and a roasted peanuts street vendor from age 13 to 14. His current focus as a convener is to cultivate transformative collective power for personal, community, and systems transformation.

Abraham earned his B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Irvine. In 2018, he also earned a master of Legal and Forensic Psychology from the University of California, Irvine studying under the guidance and direction of Dr. Elizabeth Cauffman and Dr. Ray Novaco.

Presented in partnership with:
 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and CCJFG members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & CCJFG members: Register online (you must log into your account to register).
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

We're Just Getting Started! 2020 Post-Election Debrief with Movement Leaders

Monday, December 14, 2020
2:00pm - 3:15pm

Last month, California voters made history by passing several propositions and measures to restore rights and self-determination to communities impacted by incarceration, while also rejecting racist legislation that would have rolled back decades of progress in the movement against prisons and policing.

Join us for a post-election debrief with grassroots organizers who led us to these victories by building power in communities throughout the state. We will hear about the historic passing of Proposition 17, which will restore voting rights to people impacted by incarceration; how the defeat of Proposition 25 allows us to fight for real pretrial justice, what is on the horizon in Los Angeles County with the passing of Measure J and new District Attorney George Gascón and more. Don’t miss out on this incredible opportunity to be in partnership and dialogue with these amazing movement leaders!

 

Speakers

  • Eunisses Hernandez, La Defensa
  • Gina Clayton Johnson, Essie Justice Project
  • Brian Kaneda, Californians United for a Responsible Budget
  • Roger Perez, Roy & Patricia Disney Family Foundation (moderator)
  • Taina Vargas, Initiate Justice

Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and SDG members

Registration
SCG members: Register online here
NCG & SDG members: here
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

Re-imagine LA: Dismantling Systemic Racism by Investing in Health, Housing, and Jobs

Thursday, October 29, 2020
12:00pm - 1:30pm

In unprecedented times, we need historic measures. Measure J to Re-Imagine LA would set a national precedent, permanently investing billions of dollars directly toward the health, housing, and economic justice that our communities, particularly our communities of color, have been calling out for.  

Building off the incredible work of Black Lives Matter and Alternatives to Incarceration movements locally, cross-sector leaders in Los Angeles have come together to quickly place a charter amendment on the November 3 ballot to reallocate funding for community change and homelessness prevention. With just a simple majority vote, Measure J would permanently dedicate a minimum of 10% of unrestricted locally generated tax revenues in LA County to community services and alternatives to incarceration, creating a generational investment and beginning to realign the County’s budget to the values and priorities of its residents. Now a coalition of 100+ community organizations, justice leaders, and advocates across issue areas are coming together to pass Measure J. 

Join leaders from Re-Imagine LA and the United Way of Greater Los Angeles to learn more about the Measure J campaign, how funders in any community can engage and invest in this precedent-setting measure in LA, and you can act locally to replicate the transformational impact of Measure J in your own community, if you are outside LA County.

Participation in this program is limited to private funders.

 

Speakers

•    Chris Ko, Managing Director of Homelessness & Strategic Initiatives (United Way of Greater Los Angeles) 
•    Eunisses Hernandez, Chair (Re-Imagine LA) & Co-Executive Director (La Defensa) 
•    Tommy Newman, Treasurer (Re-Imagine LA) & Senior Director of Impact Initiatives (United Way of Greater Los Angeles) 
 

PLEASE NOTE: This program is co-hosted with Funders Together to End Homelessness. Participation in this program is limited to private funders, including foundations, United Ways, corporate giving programs, individual philanthropists, and philanthropy serving organizations (PSOs). If you have questions about your eligibility to register, please contact Stephanie Chan, Director of Membership and Programs at Funders Together to End Homelessness.  

 

Partnership

 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Private funders who are members of SCG

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Event

CCJFG | Marijuana, Racial Equity and the Impact of New Laws on Black and Brown Communities

Friday, October 23, 2020
11:00am - 12:30pm

In 2016, California became the first state to legalize the sale and distribution of recreational cannabis through Proposition 64. This groundbreaking legislation aimed to heal the Drug Wars’ harmful impacts on communities of color and create revenue for a variety of social programs. Two years later, cannabis operations throughout the state have been established and are now declared as “essential businesses” during the pandemic. Meanwhile, local officials and governments have failed to invest in the economic security and healing of Black and Brown communities in order to help repair the decades of trauma, imprisonment, and poverty from racialized marijuana-related arrests. Instead, we have seen the proliferation of an industry that benefits largely white and wealthy investors while promoting an increase in law enforcement.

In this webinar, leaders in the field of marijuana equity will describe this issue in detail, including recent reports on tax revenue and marijuana-related arrests in California. We will learn about the opportunities and the considerable progress already made to move millions of dollars to communities of color through state grant programs. We will learn about the necessity of applying a social equity analysis and reparations framework to the issue, as well as how funders can support local grassroots organizing for justice reinvestment, as well as ending mass incarceration fueled by cannabis policies and industries.


Speakers

  • Malaki Seku Amen, California Urban Partnership
  • Jim Keddy, Youth Forward
  • Sarah-Michael Gaston, Youth Forward
  • Flojaune G. Cofer, Public Health Advocates

 

Partnership

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and SDG members.

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

Our Freedoms are Tied Together: Incarceration & Immigration in California

Tuesday, October 6, 2020
12:00pm - 1:30pm

Each year, thousands of noncitizens are released from state prisons and jails, often immediately detained by ICE where they face deportation, a process that the Governor and County Sheriffs have the direct power to halt. This is one of the countless connections between local and state incarceration and the criminalization, detention, and deportation of immigrants. In order to better understand these connections and how they further mass criminalization, we must adopt a power analysis and intersectional framework that exposes the deep and insidious ways these systems reinforce and build off one another.

In this webinar, our speakers will provide an overview of the organizing happening at the intersections of criminal justice, immigrant rights, and prison abolition in California. We will hear directly from people who have survived both state prison and ICE detention, as well as grassroots organizers who are leading individual freedom campaigns, and local fights against the repurposing of empty jail beds to expand immigration detention and local jail fights that involve intersections between mass incarceration and immigrant detention. This webinar is designed to support philanthropists to deepen their analysis of racial justice, power, and intersectionality as a way to support this critical community defense work that demonstrates just how intimately our freedoms are tied together.

 

Speakers

Peejay Ai, Asian Prisoner Support Committee

Liyah Assefa, Survived & Punished

Diana Campos, Sacramento ACT

Angie Junck, Heising-Simons Foundation

Sandy Valenciano, Immigrant Legal Resource Center

 

Presented in partnership with:


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and SDG members

Registration
SCG members: Register online here
NCG & SDG members: here
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

California Criminal Justice Funders Group 2020 Education Series: Grassroots Organizing

Tuesday, September 29, 2020
2:30pm - 4:00pm

What does it take to win in the fight to end prisons and criminalization? This year, we have seen historic victories from ending police contracts in Oakland’s schools to a plan to close the country’s largest jail facility in Los Angeles. These wins are the result of decades of organizing by communities directly impacted by the Prison Industrial Complex, often happening outside of the spotlight and without adequate funding. In the last session of CCJFG’s 2020 Funder Education Series, we will focus on grassroots organizing: what it entails and why it is central to movement building. We will hear directly from organizers throughout the state about key lessons, including how to prioritize healing and how to organize while incarcerated. We will learn about the importance of funding all aspects of grassroots organizing,from meeting people’s basic needs to base building to policy wins, and how philanthropy can most effectively support the longevity and dignity of movements centered on whole people.  

Please join the California Criminal Justice Funders Group for our 2020 Funder Education Series designed to deepen understanding and engagement of terms commonly heard within the criminal justice field. Our goal is to support funders in aligning themselves with the principles, strategies, and vision of movements and communities fighting against prisons and criminalization, and for the liberation and dignity of system-impacted communities and all people.

Movement leaders from various organizations throughout the state will lead each session, and will utilize an intersectional framework in which to discuss topics through multiple lenses. The series will be accessible online and open to all CCJFG members. 

 

Past Sessions

Prison Industrial Complex Abolition: A conversation amongst funders and organizers about abolition as a vision and practice for creating lasting and liberatory alternatives to criminalization, punishment, and imprisonment. You can watch this webinar here.

Healing Justice: A conversation about healing justice as a framework and practice within organizing and philanthropy that addresses the need for a systemic view of healing and practices to promote resilience and safety and build the foundation for strong movements and organizations. View the webinar here

 

Moderator

Alex Tom, Center for Empowered Politics

 

Speakers

Tamu Jones, The California Endowment 

Abraham Medina, California Alliance For Youth and Community Justice 

Romarilyn Ralston, California Coalition for Women Prisoners

 

Presented in partnership with:


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and SDG members

Registration
SCG members: Register online here
NCG & SDG members: here
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions

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