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DISASTER & EMERGENCY

Event

Incarcerated Firefighters: At the Intersection of Abolition, Workforce Development, and Wildfire Resilience

Wednesday, July 28, 2021
10:00am - 11:30am

As California wildfires devastate communities throughout the state, significant financial, material and human resources are deployed to support recovery and reduce their threats on communities. Despite the well-publicized socioeconomic and health impacts of wildfires and philanthropic support, little attention is paid to the experience and needs of incarcerated firefighters. Incarcerated firefighters risk their lives to protect Californians while simultaneously experiencing the racism and oppression of imprisonment and criminalization. At the height of last year’s historic wildfire season, many trained, incarcerated firefighters were sidelined from the state’s firefighting efforts due to closures of prison firefighting camps as a result of COVID-19 outbreaks. Furthermore, many incarcerated firefighters are paid minimally for working in dangerous conditions and are unable to use their skills to obtain municipal firefighting careers upon their release due to their criminal records.

 

Join us to

Hear from formerly incarcerated firefighters and impacted community members who are working at the intersections of racial equity, prison industrial complex abolition, workforce development, and wildfire resilience. Speakers will discuss important topics, including:

The use of prison labor to address the state’s workforce shortage to combat wildfires and the barriers to sustainable workforce development post-release

  • The experience of firefighting while in prison and the role and current status of prison fire camps.
  • The need to remove barriers to employment and support for incarcerated people to re-enter communities.
  • Philanthropy’s role in advocating to end involuntary servitude as punishment and support organizations at the frontline in addressing these intersectional challenges.

 

Moderator

Romarilyn Ralston, Program Director, Project Rebound, California State University - Fullerton 

Romarilyn Ralston is the Program Director of Project Rebound at Cal State Fullerton and the Co-Chair of the CSU Project Rebound Consortium Policy and Advocacy Committee. A black feminist prison abolitionist scholar working to interrupt criminalization at the intersections of race, gender, and education, Ralston earned a Bachelor’s degree in Gender & Feminist Studies from Pitzer College and a Master’s degree in Liberal Arts from Washington University in St. Louis. She is the recipient of Pitzer College’s 2020 Distinguished Alumni Award, California State Senator Ling Ling Chang’s 2020 Woman of Distinction Social Justice Champion Award, and the 2018 Civil Rights and Advocacy Award from the Orange County Chapter of the National Council of 100 Black Women. Ralston was a 2018 Fellow of the Women's Policy Institute, whereas a member of the criminal justice reform team she helped to pass several pieces of legislation into law. Ralston has also held fellowships with Just Leadership USA, CORO Public Affairs, and the Napier Initiative for Justice and Peace.

 

Speakers

George Galvis, Executive Director, Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice (CURYJ)

George Galvis has promoted restorative justice and healing to transform lives. He draws from personal experience and his indigenous roots to help young people, particularly those involved in the criminal justice system, become community leaders for positive change. Galvis advocates for at-risk youth, prisoners, and formerly imprisoned individuals with children. As a board member of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, Galvis helped create All of Us or None, which fights for the rights of formerly and currently incarcerated people and families. He has led statewide advocacy efforts to transform punitive school and juvenile justice policies that disparately impact youth of color and has developed traditional rites of passage programs as healthy alternatives to gang violence. He also serves as the co-Director of the California Alliance for Youth and Community Justice (CAYCJ), a broad coalition working collectively to end youth incarceration, youth treatment as adults, and build community capacity for alternatives to incarceration that empower young people in California.

 

Amika Mota, Policy Director, Young Women’s Freedom Center

Amika began organizing for Reproductive Justice and young mothers’ rights over twenty years ago, as a teen mama and midwife. Her passion for criminal justice reform is rooted in her own experience. She began advocating for women in prison during her seven-year incarceration in the California Department of Corrections, where she served time at both CIW and CCWF. During her time inside, she was a jailhouse lawyer, paralegal, firefighter, and mentor to many young folks in the yard. The sisterhood and resilience of the women on the inside are what motivate her to revolutionize the criminal justice system, transform what true rehabilitation and reentry look like, and promote a culture of healing and restorative justice to those most impacted by the system. She is committed to lifting up the voices, visibility, and leadership of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women.

Brandon Smith, Executive Director, Forestry & Fire Recruitment Program (FFRP)

Brandon Smith is the Executive Director of The Forestry and Fire Recruitment Program (FFRP), a nonprofit organization helping those in California’s Fire Camps obtain gainful employment once released. After being incarcerated in California’s Fire Camps and responding to all hazardous risks, Brandon found a way to transition into a professional wildland firefighter career post-release. Since then he has been an advocate for criminal justice and environmental reform. Brandon worked six years (both in and out of fire camp) as a wildland firefighter and forestry technician. He attended the University of California- Berkeley and the Victor Valley Colleges Wildland Academy. He has been advocating for and supporting the fire camp population since 2014.

Presented in partnership with:


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members

Registration
SCG members: Register online here
NCG & Catalyst members: here
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event type 
Event

Addressing Data Gaps for Equitable Implementation of Climate and Disaster Resilience Solutions in California

Friday, June 25, 2021
10:00am - 11:00am

Funding for community-based programs for climate and disaster resilience relies on information about who is at risk and who is impacted. Existing data on health and socioeconomic risks of and impacts, especially data that reflect the experiences of socially marginalized populations, are often missing or not collected, resulting in climate and disaster narratives and resourcing efforts that often overlook their voices and needs. As extreme climate events, such as heatwaves, droughts, and wildfires are expected to be more frequent and intense in the coming years, there are tremendous opportunities for philanthropy to catalyze an inclusive effort around data collection and integration, thus ensuring climate and disaster policies and programs include community voices, support frontline communities, and promote sustained community resilience.

Speakers will share the state of the data landscape in addressing climate and disaster risks and impacts. They will discuss implications of the current data landscape on existing climate and disaster policies, funding, and programs, and they will also share their perspectives about opportunities for philanthropic engagement that can advance equitable resourcing and implementation of resilience solutions in communities across the state.

The scope of this webinar will address the intersection of climate and disaster resilience and existing public health, racial and economic challenges facing frontline communities.

 

Key Reports: 

 

Moderator

Alan Kwok

Director of Climate and Disaster Resilience, Philanthropy California

Alan Kwok is the director of climate and disaster resilience for Philanthropy California (Philanthropy CA)–an alliance of Northern CaliforniaGrantmakers, Southern CaliforniaGrantmakers, and Catalyst of San Diego and Imperial Counties –that comprises 600+ philanthropic organizations and groups across California. He leads Philanthropy California’s climate and disaster resilience strategies, and his role is to strengthen and galvanize the philanthropic sector in California around investments and advocacy in community-based climate and disaster resilience. He earned his Ph.D. in Emergency Management at the Joint Centre for Disaster Research at Massey University, New Zealand, and an M.A. in Geography with a focus on Resource Management and Environmental Planning at San Francisco State University.

 

Speakers

Teresa Feo

Senior Science Officer, California Council on Science and Technology (CCST)

Teresa Feocontributes to the delivery of CCST’s science services, including peer-reviewed reports and expert briefings, and to and to CCST’s work engaging the philanthropic community. Teresa is committed to forming connections between scientists and policymakers on a wide range of issues impacting the state of California and is the lead author of The Costs of Wildfire in California. Prior to joining CCST, Teresa was a CCST Science and Technology Policy Fellow in the California State Senate Office of Research where she provided research and analysis on a broad range of policy topics including natural resources, environmental quality, health, veterans’ affairs, and professional licensing boards. Teresa received her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Yale University.

 

Sona Mohnot

Associate Director, Climate Resilience, Greenlining Institute

Sona Mohnot works on creating equitable climate adaptation and resilience strategies to ensure that communities hit first and worst by climate disasters have the resources and support needed to adapt to a changing climate and thrive in spite of it. She was the lead author of Making Equity Real in Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience Policies and Programs, a guidebook for policymakers on how to meaningfully embed equity in resilience efforts. Sona also serves as a council member on the Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resiliency Program (ICARP), out of the Governor's Office of Planning and Research, and is a member of the California Climate Insurance Working Group, out of the California Department of Insurance. She holds a J.D. from Tulane School of Law and her LL.M in Natural Resources and Environmental Law from Lewis and Clark Law School.

 

Gabriela Orantes

Fellow, Latino Community Foundation’s Just Recovery at North Bay Organizing Project

Gabriela Orantes supports the Latino Community Foundation’s Just Recovery cohort of partners to leverage, coordinate, and advance civic engagement and community advocacy in the region, post-2017 wildfires. Through this work, she has been an advocate for language justice in formal disaster response and government spaces by highlighting the intersections of language, disasters, and public participation. Her academic and career paths are informed by her upbringing in an immigrant household in northern California that benefited from the deep relationships and support of the Fairfax-San Anselmo Children's Center. Gabriela holds a Master’s in Public Administration along with Graduate Certificates in Non-Profit Management, Women Studies, and Planning Studies.

Amee Raval

Research Director, Asian Pacific Environmental Network (APEN)

Amee Raval is Research Director at the Asian Pacific Environmental Network, an environmental justice organization that empowers Asian immigrant and refugee communities across California through grassroots organizing, voter engagement, and policy advocacy. Through her role at APEN, she offers an environmental justice and health equity lens to climate and energy policy in California. She is the lead author of Mapping Resilience: A Blueprint for Thriving in the Face of Climate Disasters and contributing author to Resilience Before Disaster: The Need to Build Equitable, Community-Driven Social Infrastructure, two foundational reports that are directly influencing statewide decisions on climate resilience. Amee holds an MSPH in Environmental Health Sciences from UC Berkeley School of Public Health.

 

Presented in partnership with:

 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & Catalyst members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

Grounded Action: Grassroots Movements and Climate Justice | Session 2

Friday, April 16, 2021
10:00am - 11:30am

In philanthropy, ‘grassroots’ is often equated with ‘community’ and with ‘small-scale’. Grassroots solutions do come from the community, but they are not often small. And because grassroots solutions come from the people most impacted by the problem they seek to solve, they can be more effective and holistic in the problems they address.

As communities around California, the nation, and the world are facing increasing impacts and threats from the climate crisis, funders have a unique opportunity to invest in movements building locally, nationally, and internationally. The climate crisis demands that "business as usual" stop and transform, and that includes philanthropy.

In this two-part dialogue series, we will unpack the many different forms of grassroots action in confronting the climate crisis, and hear directly from frontline voices on the inroads for -and the hurdles facing -grassroots movements. We will also address the question, “What role does philanthropy play in supporting action towards justice, collective health, and sustainability?”

The CLIMA Fund and guest speakers from grassroots movements will connect the dots across the ecological and social crises, and how grassroots solutions are growing to meet the challenge. This two-part series will help you break down what that means for you and your grant portfolio. Participants will walk away from the series with a deeper understanding of how climate justice movements are advancing change, and how they can practically take action in support. Institutional funders, individual donors, and philanthropic advisors are encouraged to join.

Session 2 will unpack the nitty-gritty of funding grassroots movements and why the climate crisis requires action beyond borders. It will highlight key lessons of how funders1) are sharing or shifting power to their grantee partners, 2) challenges to/mistakes in accompanying social movements and how they have overcome them, and 3) opportunities for working with grassroots movements at this moment. We will also share resources for having conversations with colleagues and peers in philanthropy about climate justice and movement building.

To register for both events, please click the "Register Now" button. Click here to join us for Session 1 >

 

Speakers

Angie Chen

Senior Program Officer and Community Engagement Director, Libra Foundation

Angie (she/her) brings deep experience in the nonprofit and philanthropic sectors to her work at The Libra Foundation, with particular strengths in nurturing community and building coalitions. In her role, she leads Environmental and Climate Justice grantmaking and community engagement. As founding Executive Director of the Blue Sky Funders Forum, Angie created and oversaw all aspects of a national funder collaborative focused on expanding equitable access to opportunities to learn, play, and grow outdoors. Prior to Blue Sky, Angie served as an advisor to the Pisces Foundation during its formation and as Program Officer at the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, where she supported capacity-building efforts during its spend down. Angie has also designed and managed strategic initiatives at the Pacific Forest & Watershed Lands Stewardship Council and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. And she previously consulted and worked at nonprofit and government organizations that provide safety net services.

Laura García

President and CEO, Greengrants Fund

Laura (she/her)is a Mexican feminist who has advocated for human rights, social justice, and civil society throughout her career. Before joining Global Greengrants, Laura served for seven years as the Executive Director of Fondo Semillas, a Mexican nonprofit organization that finances grassroots organizations to achieve gender equality. Laura has vast experience in grassroots philanthropy, human rights, and movements for social justice, and she has co-created networks to promote community philanthropy in the Global South. She holds a Master's Degree in International Peace and Security, from King’s College, London. She currently serves on the boards of Oxfam Mexico, Justicia Transicional MX, El Día Después, and the Global Fund for Community Foundations.

Doria Robinson

Executive Director, Urban Tilth

Doria (she/her) is a third-generation resident of Richmond, California, and the Executive Director of Urban Tilth. Raised in a strong church community where her grandfather was the minister, Doria spent weekends and summers on the church’s 350-acre ranch in Fairfield, California. It was on the ATOT ranch where she was taught the power of cooperative economics by her grandfather. At Urban Tilth, she led the charge to develop the organization’s three-acre urban farm in Richmond and relaunched the Farm-to-Table CSA social entrepreneurial venture, which now serves hyper-local and sustainably grown produce to 440 west county families each week. Most recently she co-founded Cooperation Richmond, a not-for-profit cooperative developer and one-stop-shop for the incubation, education, training, mentorship, and capital support for cooperative enterprises in Richmond that build community-controlled wealth by and for low-income communities and communities of color.

 

Moderator

Lindley Mease

Director, Climate Leaders in Movement Action (CLIMA) Fund 

Lindley (she/they) is dedicated to building solidarity for grassroots movements advancing just and regenerative solutions to climate change. In addition to coordinating the CLIMA Fund, Lindley is the Co-Founder of Blue Heart, an organization that organizes millennial donors to give to frontline organizations in the U.S. In these roles, she is working to advance accountable philanthropy and to elevate the stories of grassroots organizations building real political power. Lindley also teaches at Stanford University’s Design School; is a community mediator; an avid watercolorist and salsa dancer; and is a member of LeftRoots, a national formation of social movement activists.

 

Presented in partnership with:


 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & Catalyst members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

Grounded Action: Grassroots Movements and Climate Justice | Session 1

Friday, April 9, 2021
10:00am - 11:30am

In philanthropy, ‘grassroots’ is often equated with ‘community’ and with ‘small-scale’. Grassroots solutions do come from the community, but they are not often small. And because grassroots solutions come from the people most impacted by the problem they seek to solve, they can be more effective and holistic in the problems they address.

As communities around California, the nation, and the world are facing increasing impacts and threats from the climate crisis, funders have a unique opportunity to invest in movements building locally, nationally, and internationally. The climate crisis demands that "business as usual" stop and transform, and that includes philanthropy.

In this two-part dialogue series, we will unpack the many different forms of grassroots action in confronting the climate crisis, and hear directly from frontline voices on the inroads for -and the hurdles facing -grassroots movements. We will also address the question, “What role does philanthropy play in supporting action towards justice, collective health, and sustainability?”

The CLIMA Fund and guest speakers from grassroots movements will connect the dots across the ecological and social crises, and how grassroots solutions are growing to meet the challenge. This two-part series will help you break down what that means for you and your grant portfolio. Participants will walk away from the series with a deeper understanding of how climate justice movements are advancing change, and how they can practically take action in support. Institutional funders, individual donors, and philanthropic advisors are encouraged to join.

Session 1 will address the following dialogue questions: What is ‘grassroots’? Why & how are grassroots movements the greatest hope for minimizing climate impacts? How grassroots movements work within, outside, and beyond the system. We will outline the four types of grassroots climate solutions in the Soil to Sky: Climate Solutions That Work report, the importance of frontline leadership, and the characteristics of grassroots solutions.

To register for both events, please click the "Register Now" button. Click here to join us for Session 2 >

 

Speakers

Wendy Cruz

Technical Advisor, La Via Campesina (International Peasants’ Movement)

Wendy’s (she/her) career has focused on the international peasants' movement Vía Campesina. As a feminist, she is part of the international platform on November 25th-International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. She works to advance the feminist movement to enable the reflection around women’s progress and actions on the social, political, and economic change that support a just society for women in Honduras.Through her work with theInstituto de Formación Cooperativista (Cooperative Development Institute), she helped form Organizaciones Campesinas de Honduras(Peasant Organizations of Honduras). She continues her work as part of the technical team withVía Campesina, which focuses on supporting rural women, as well as working on projects related to human rights, organizational development, and land defense.

Solomé Lemma 

Executive Director, Thousand Currents 

Solomé (she/her) works closely with the board to set the strategic direction for Thousand Currents and is responsible for ensuring Thousand Currents remains a dynamic, innovative, and financially-sound organization, rooted in its support of grassroots partners. A champion of social transformation through community-driven initiatives, Solomé joins Thousand Currents from Africans in the Diaspora (AiD), an initiative she co-founded and led for four years before its merger with Thousand Currents. Previously, Solomé served as Global Fund for Children’s Senior Program Officer for Africa, managing a portfolio of over 100 grassroots organizations in about 25 countries. She has also worked with the UN Development Programme in Ethiopia, Human Rights Watch in New York City, and International Rescue Committee in Liberia. She is a White House Champion of Change for her work with diaspora communities, a fierce supporter of local leadership, and is a strong voice against “inequitable and ineffective partnerships.” She was named one of Foreign Policy Magazine’s “100 women to follow on Twitter” at @innovateafrica.

Maria Lopez-Nuñez

Deputy Director of Organizing and Advocacy, Ironbound Community Corporation / Climate Justice Alliance

Maria (she/her) grew up in Bushwick and remembers going back to Honduras as a kid to connect with her roots and swim in her rivers. Being displaced multiple times by colonization, racism, and violence sparked her commitment to fight multiple extractive industries and end sacrifice zones once and for all. The Ironbound district of Newark, New Jersey, where she resides is predominantly Black and Latinx, is one of the most toxic neighborhoods in the country, and like many are also getting gentrified at an unprecedented rate. In her role as Deputy Director of Advocacy and Organizing of Ironbound Community Corporation (ICC); she fights the bad and builds the new challenging the current political system, holding power brokers and polluters accountable while fighting for environmental, housing, immigrant, and racial justice. She has organized and helped the passage of historic and landmark city and state legislation such as the Right to Council, the Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), and the Environmental Justice Cumulative Impacts Bill. All of which will significantly increase the quality of life of those that are often deemed disposable.

 

Moderator

Lindley Mease

Director, Climate Leaders in Movement Action (CLIMA) Fund

Lindley (she/they) is dedicated to building solidarity for grassroots movements advancing just and regenerative solutions to climate change. In addition to coordinating the CLIMA Fund, Lindley is the Co-Founder of Blue Heart, an organization that organizes millennial donors to give to frontline organizations in the U.S. In these roles, she is working to advance accountable philanthropy and to elevate the stories of grassroots organizations building real political power. Lindley also teaches at Stanford University’s Design School; is a community mediator; an avid watercolorist and salsa dancer; and is a member of LeftRoots, a national formation of social movement activists.

 

Presented in partnership with:


 

 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & Catalyst members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

Funders' Briefing on COVID-19 Vaccine

Monday, March 1, 2021
11:00am - 12:00pm

California has recently accelerated its vaccine distribution plan. While the vaccine rollout is in full swing, new challenges and inequities have surfaced in its community outreach, engagement, and rollout process. How should philanthropy use its collective power to respond to this crisis and provide support to public and community partners? What can we expect in 2021 as communities of color continue to face disproportionate health disparities and economic consequences? We invite you to join this briefing on Monday (03/01) at 11:00am PST to hear from leading experts on what you and your foundations can do during this critical stage in our history to control the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Follow up program: A Conversation on Equitable Vaccine Distribution

Following SCG’s March 1st Funders’ Briefing on the Covid-19 Vaccine, join SCG’s Health Funders on March 9th for an interactive follow-up conversation. We will hear updates from several local leaders and partners and then provide space for attendees to update one another on their work related to the vaccine, ask questions, and share identified needs and gaps. Learn more

 

Speakers

Isabel Becerra

CEO, Coalition of Orange County Community Health Centers  

Isabel Becerra is CEO of the Coalition of Orange County Community Health Centers. She has more than 30 years of experience working in public health. As CEO, she provides administrative leadership, financial direction and oversight of advocacy matters on behalf of Orange County community health centers. She also maintains effective relationships with elected officials, funders and other stakeholders. Prior to the Coalition, she worked at North County Health Services, a Federally Qualified Health Center in San Marcos, California. She was prepared for these roles through a MATCH Fellowship, a comprehensive program that educates leaders on all aspects of operating community health organizations sponsored by the National Association of Community Health Centers, Johns Hopkins University and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Becerra currently serves on multiple boards, including the California Wellness Foundation and the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Pomona College. Becerra was appointed a CalOptima director in August 2020.

 

Oliver T. Brooks, MD

Chief Medical Officer, Watts HealthCare Corporation & Co-Chair, California Covid-19 Drafting Guidelines Workgroup

Dr. Oliver Brooks has been with Watts Healthcare since 1989.  He was appointed Medical Director on October 16, 2016, and previously served as Associate Medical Director, Chief of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine and is the Medical Director for the Jordan and Locke School-based Wellness Centers.  He is also chairman of the quality management committee.

Appointments have included serving on the Executive Committee of Centinela Hospital where he was Chairman of their Peer Review Committee and on the Physician Quality Committee for LA Care Health Plan.  Dr. Brooks is past president of the Golden State (CA) Medical Association and past president of the Miller-Lawrence Medical and Dental Society. In 2019, he was elected to the office of the President of the National Medical Association.

Dr. Brooks holds a degree in chemistry from Morehouse College and a medical degree from Howard University.

 

Rose Veniegas

Senior Program Officer, Health, California Community Foundation  

With 23 years of experience in health promotion, Rosemary Veniegas currently serves as Senior Program Officer for Health at the California Community Foundation (CCF). CCF is the third oldest community foundation in the U.S., after Cleveland Community Foundation and Chicago Community Trust, with a mission to lead positive systemic change that strengthens Los Angeles (LA) County. Dr. Veniegas serves as the Chair of the LA County Commission on Hospitals and Healthcare Delivery as well as co-chair of the LA COVID-19 Vaccine Work Group Aligning Resources Committee. Previously, Dr. Veniegas was an implementation scientist and researcher in academic departments of family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, psychology, and psychiatry. She received her Ph.D. in social psychology from UCLA. She was a 2017 recipient of the Victory Institute Bohnett Leaders Fellowship to participate in the Harvard Kennedy School Senior Executives in State and Local Government Program.

 

Aquilina Soriano Versoza

Executive Director, Pilipino Workers Center

Aquilina Soriano Versoza is Executive Director of the Pilipino Workers Center of Southern California, a nonprofit serving and organizing Pilipino immigrant workers in Los Angeles. Aquilina is also serving as the current President of the Board of Directors of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and a general Board Member of Mission Assets. She was a recipient of the 2018 Frederick Douglass 200 Abolitionist award. She studied her BA in Asian American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.


Presented in partnership with:



Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current EPIP, SCG, NCG, and Catalyst members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
EPIP, NCG, & Catalyst members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Event

COVID-19 Funders’ Briefing: 2021 Outlook

Tuesday, December 15, 2020
2:00pm - 3:00pm

As COVID-19 case rates continue to climb nationwide, new federal leadership and promising vaccine trials present some hope for the coming year. As we continue to grapple with the public health repercussions, California also faces serious economic consequences. Communities of color are facing disproportionate impacts across the board, and many sectors including nonprofits and local governments are in perilous financial situations. Join us to hear more about what we should expect in 2021, how the issues philanthropy cares about will be affected, and what we can do to respond.

 

Speaker

Chris Hoene

Executive Director, California Budget & Policy Center

Chris Hoene became the Budget Center’s executive director in October 2012, bringing to the organization 15 years of leadership in state and local policy research and analysis. He leads the strategic direction of the organization, acts as primary spokesperson, and works with the board of directors and community partners to implement our vision and mission. Prior to joining the Budget Center, Chris was director of the Center for Research and Innovation at the National League of Cities in Washington, DC, leading efforts to analyze trends in local and state government and promote constructive policy action on issues including public finance, economic development, housing, poverty reduction, infrastructure, and governance.  Chris also previously worked for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington, DC, and the Public Policy Institute of California in San Francisco. Chris holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Claremont Graduate University and a bachelor’s degree in Political Science of the College of Idaho. In 2011, in recognition of his service to the state and local community, Chris was elected as a Fellow into the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA).

Dr. Christina Ghaly, M.D.

Director, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services

Dr. Ghaly was appointed by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors as the Director of the Department of Health Services (DHS) on September 25, 2018 after having served in the role as Acting Director since October 2017. In this capacity, Dr. Ghaly has had responsibility for overseeing the operations of the County’s four public hospitals and 23 outpatient clinics. She leads strategic, operational, and clinical/financial initiatives critical to DHS’ financial health and continued transformation in an era of health reform.

Dr. Ghaly previously served as Chief Operations Officer for DHS from 2016 until her permanent appointment as Director.  Her previous roles within DHS also include serving as the Deputy Director for Strategy and Operations and as the Interim Chief Executive Officer at Olive View – UCLA Medical Center and LAC+USC Medical Center.

In 2015, Dr. Ghaly served in a temporary role as the Director of Health Care Integration for the County of Los Angeles Chief Executive Office. This position was created to lead an assessment regarding the potential creation of a health care agency, integrating the Departments of Health Services, Mental Health (DMH) and Public Health (DPH). The Los Angeles County Health Agency was formally created in November 2015.

Dr. Ghaly attended Harvard Medical School and completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Ghaly currently sees patients in the urgent care and on the inpatient medicine service at LAC+USC Medical Center and  Olive View – UCLA Medical Center, respectively.

Deepa Iyer

Director of Movement Building, Building Movement Project; Director, Solidarity Is

Deepa Iyer is a South Asian American writer, lawyer, facilitator, and activist. She is the Director of Movement Building at Building Movement Project and director of Solidarity Is, a project that provides trainings, narratives, and resources on building deep and lasting multiracial solidarity and sustainability of social change ecosystems.

Iyer served as executive director of South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT) for a decade, and has held positions at Race Forward, the US Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, the Asian Pacific American Legal Resource Center, and the Asian American Justice Center.

Iyer’s first book We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future (The New Press 2015), received a 2016 American Book Award. She hosts a podcast called Solidarity Is This to explore solidarity practices around the country. Iyer has received fellowships from Open Society Foundations and the Social Change Initiative, and in 2019, she received an honorary doctoral degree from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Iyer serves on the Advisory Council of the Emergent Fund.

An immigrant who moved to Kentucky from India when she was twelve, Iyer graduated from the University of Notre Dame Law School and Vanderbilt University.

Presented by:

 

 

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG, NCG, and SDG members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
NCG & SDG members: Please contact [email protected] to register.
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Event

Southern California Funders' Discussion on COVID-19: No Going Back LA

Thursday, September 10, 2020
9:00am - 10:00am

By now it has become clear that the COVID-19 pandemic has been doing disproportionate harm to Black and Latinx communities in L.A. County who were already dealing with the impacts of widespread systemic racism.

Over the last few months, the Committee for Greater L.A. has formed to tackle these impacts and is composed of leaders in philanthropy, nonprofits, community groups, private sector and City and County government in partnership with the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and the USC Equity Research Institute. The Committee has produced No Going Back, set to launch on September 8, a mandate for action that lays out a series of recommendations and strategies to help guide policymakers and civic leaders towards a recovery plan that addresses and prioritizes systemic racism helps us to align systems towards helping the most marginalized communities and fosters an ongoing civic conversation.

Please join us to hear from Steering Committee members as they present and discuss the No Going Back recommendations and engage members in a conversation about how philanthropy can support long-term, inclusive recovery.

 

Speakers:

Fred Ali

President & CEO, The Weingart Foundation

Fred Ali has more than 40 years of senior management experience with philanthropy, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions and government. He began his career in 1972 as a volunteer teacher and counselor in a small western Alaska village. Over the next 19 years, Fred held a number of leadership positions in Alaska with nonprofit organizations, state government, and higher education. In 1991, he became the executive director of Covenant House in Los Angeles. Under Fred’s leadership, Covenant House California developed into a large, multi-service program working with homeless and at-risk youth in Los Angeles and Oakland.

Fred was appointed president of the Weingart Foundation in 1999. He serves on the boards of Covenant House California, the MLK Health and Wellness Community Development Corporation, and the Mayor’s Fund for Los Angeles. Fred also chairs the board of advisors for the University of Southern California’s Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy and co-chairs the Center’s national advisory committee for the Irene Hirano Inouye’s Philanthropic Leadership Fund. Fred speaks regularly on issues pertaining to the nonprofit sector including equity, organizational effectiveness and capacity building.

Sarah Dusseault

Chair, Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Commission

Sarah Dusseault serves on the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) Commission. Appointed by Supervisor Solis, she is outgoing Commission Chair and is currently Chair of the Ad Hoc Committee on Governance Reform. She also served as Co-Chair of LAHSA’s Ad Hoc Committee on Women & Homelessness. Sarah is committed to including women’s unique experiences in policy-making and investing in systems change to bring a crisis response to homelessness.

Sarah began her career in public service with Mayor Jim Hahn, as his campaign Policy Director. She served in senior roles in the Office of the Mayor as Assistant Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and Deputy Mayor for Housing and Homelessness where she led efforts to revitalize Downtown Los Angeles and oversaw the creation of L.A.’s affordable housing trust fund — at the time the largest of its kind in America. Sarah served as Senior Policy Advisor to Mayor Eric Garcetti during his 2013 mayoral campaign, and during his tenure as President of the City Council. Sarah also worked as Chief of Staff to Councilmember David Ryu, the first Korean American ever elected to the Los Angeles City Council.

Throughout her career, Sarah has gained a reputation as a passionate advocate, policy expert, and an innovative problem solver. Sarah serves in various leadership roles in her community, including as a mentor to many young women and girls, an Advisory Board Member for the Los Angeles Business Council and Board member of the Los Angeles LGBT Center assisting in their work to open an intergenerational campus addressing the needs of people experiencing homelessness. Sarah’s passion for ending homelessness and advocating for mental health derives from her lived experience of a family member who is experiencing both. Her experiences trying to house her brother were printed in the LA Times - https://lat.ms/2TlZzj4

She is a graduate of Yale College and earned her J.D. from UCLA. She is married to Chris Dusseault, a key member of the legal team in Hollingsworth v. Perry, the case that successfully challenged and overturned California’s Proposition 8 before the United States Supreme Court. They are raising two sons.

Miguel A. Santana

President & CEO, Fairplex

Miguel A. Santana is the President and CEO of Fairplex, a private nonprofit 487-acre entertainment and education complex in Pomona. With a mission to build community and strengthen the economy, the vision for the Fairplex campus is to create an experiential environment for the community to live, learn,
work and play. By forging collaborative relationships with the region’s educational institutions, government officials and community residents, Mr. Santana is focused on the transformation of Fairplex into a 21st century sustainable, globally recognized venue and economic engine grounded in its agricultural roots.


Prior to his employment at Fairplex, Mr. Santana was the City Administrative Officer for the City of Los Angeles from 2009 through 2016. Mr. Santana reported directly to the Mayor and the City Council. As the CAO, his office directed oversight over the City’s $9 billion budget, labor negotiations, debt
management and major policy issues as directed by the Mayor and/or City Council, including the proprietary departments of Department of Water and Power, Airport and Harbor. As CAO, Mr. Santana played a central role in developing a comprehensive strategy on homelessness in partnership with the
County of Los Angeles.


In 2017, he was appointed by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti to serve on the city’s Proposition HHH Citizens Oversight Committee, an administrative council that will play a vital role in developing housing for homeless Angelenos funded through a bond measure approved by L.A. voters, and served as
Chairman until 2019.


Mr. Santana has more than 25 years of experience managing numerous fiscal, legislative, political and community issues. Previously, Mr. Santana served as one of five Deputy Chief Executive Officers for Los Angeles County. Prior to that, he served as Chief of Staff for Supervisor Gloria Molina. Mr. Santana has a B.A. in Sociology and Latin American Studies from Whittier College and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Harvard University. Mr. Santana serves on the boards of the Weingart Foundation; the United Way of Greater Los Angeles; California Community Foundation;
Discovery Cube; and Whittier College Board of Trustees.

Gary Segura

Dean, Luskin School of Public Affairs

Before beginning his appointment as Dean at UCLA Luskin in January 2017, professor Segura served as the Morris M. Doyle Centennial Professor of Public Policy, professor of political science, and professor and former chair of Chicana/o-Latina/o studies at Stanford University. His research focuses on issues of political representation and social cleavages, the domestic politics of wartime public opinion and the politics of America’s growing Latino minority. Additionally, he has briefed members of Congress and senior administration officials on issues related to Latinos, served as an expert witness in three marriage equality cases heard by the Supreme Court, and has filed amicus curiae briefs on subjects as diverse as voting rights, marriage equality and affirmative action.

 


Fee
No cost to participate

Who May Attend
Current SCG members and eligible non-members

Registration
SCG members: Register online (you must log in to your SCG account to register).
Non-members: Register online. If you do not have an SCG account, contact us.
If you have additional questions regarding these sessions, please contact us at [email protected]

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
If you have a disability and require accommodation in order to fully participate in this activity, please contact our programs team at [email protected] or (213) 680-8866. You will be contacted by someone from our staff to discuss your specific needs.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Funding Area 
Event

Southern California Funders' Discussion on COVID-19: Education Funders Group on the Reopening of Schools and After School Programs

Thursday, August 13, 2020
9:00am - 10:30am

The question of whether and how to reopen schools and after-school programs this fall is becoming increasingly urgent.

Funding Issue Area & Geographic Regions
Funding Area 

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