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Resources from the 2019 Annual Conference

Publication date: 
Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Over 700 colleagues attended SCG’s 2019 Annual Conference, Foresight Philanthropy for a day filled with interactive plenaries, inspiring keynote speakers, and skill-building workshops designed to propel us into the future. Funders sharpened their grantmaking strategies and engaged in cross-sector collaborations to become dynamics changemakers and use the tools of futurism to create a community ready for the shifting demographics and cutting-edge technologies of tomorrow. Below you will find key takeaways and resources from the conference.

 

Jump to:      Pre-Conference Resources      Morning Keynote     Morning Breakout Sessions     Afternoon Keynote     Afternoon Breakout Sessions

 

 

Pre-Conference Resources

Key readings to prepare for Foresight Philanthropy

 

Resources

A Conversation with Trista Harris 

The Future of Good - Trista Harris 

Haben: The Deafblind Woman Who Conquered Harvard Law - Haben Girma

Foresight & Philanthropy: Towards a New Alliance 

Exploring the Future: Scanning the Horizon

Trends in Education Philanthropy: Benchmarking 2018-19

A Roadmap to an Equitable Law-Carbon Future: Four Pillars for a Just Transition

Bridging the Manufacturing and Construction Skills Gap

How Foundations are Using Impact Investing to Advance Racial Equity

 

Morning Keynote

 

Challenging Historical Assumptions to Improve our Future

 

Resources

Presentation

 

 

 

Morning Breakout Sessions

Aligning Assets with Mission: How Impact Investing can Advance Equity

 

Key Takeaways

  • There is a wide range of strategies and tools in impact investing that each have different risk/reward ratio including mission-related investments, program-related investments, and environmental, social and governance factors.
  • Before choosing an impact investing tool, it is important to clearly articulate the foundation’s core values which will serve as a lens to evaluate investment objectives.
  • Key leadership within a foundation must be aligned in their goals, strategies, risks, and impact. Furthermore, it is important to be part of an ecosystem of foundations that collaborate with their impact investments.

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Resources

California Community Foundation Impact Investing Profile

The California Endowment Impact Investing Profile

Weingart Impact Investing Profile

 

Beyond Mass Incarceration: Cross-Sectoral Strategies for a Better Future

 

Key Takeaways

  • Los Angeles County has the largest jail population in the United States. There is opportunity in Los Angeles to model criminal justice reform for the whole world.
  • An unsubstantiated health frame has been used to justify building new jails, and until now, no counter-narrative has been stated by healthcare providers. The worst place for someone with a mental health condition is jail. We need to use resources to build treatment centers, not more jails.
  • Intersectional coalition building is essential to criminal justice reform. Philanthropy has the power and resources to implement better systems and make room for candid and open conversations with organizers and community leaders.

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Great Scott! Back to the Future of Work

 

Key Takeaways

  • The future of work has a misconception of a robot-takeover, when in fact, it is humanity who designs the tools. We have the agency to conceptualize and implement technology.
  • When considering the future of work, we need to also consider the future types of work. Thinking of ways to close the “skills-gap” is not enough as not every job will be automated or will require advanced technology. We need to consider equity in different types of jobs and ensure there are quality jobs with living wages and working conditions.
  • Foundations funding in workforce development or secondary education should consider a “future of work” lens in their grantmaking. For example, Lumina Foundation is funding a “credential transparency language” initiative so that prospective students or apprentices will be able to know precisely what their credential will account for. This is essential since there are currently over 750,000 unique credentials leaving much room for confusion and difficulty navigating which credential to pursue.

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Resources

Presentation

 

Mapping the Future: Community Representation for the Decade Ahead

 

Key Takeaways

  • The redistricting process gathers its core data and statistical information from the Census, however, data alone does not tell the whole story. Demographers and mappers need communities to voice their stories to help draw district lines. “Redistricting is not only about the quantitative data, qualitative data and storytelling is also important.” – Steven Ochoa, MALDEF
  • It is important for all communities of interest to work together and form a cohesive plan that takes into consideration all views and avoids competing interests. Unity Mapping aims at achieving fair representation for all communities of color and demonstrates a condensed and organized plan.
  • Early investments in education and collaboration are highly important for the success of both the census and the later process of redistricting. Although a large amount of funding is required for on-the-ground work, organizations also need to allocate a significant amount of resources to hire and retain highly skilled mappers and maintain mapping software.

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Poverty as a Public Health Crisis: Understanding the Intersection Between Health & Wealth

 

Key Takeaways

  • There is a need to change the narrative around poverty and to create an understanding that it requires a cross-sector response. There's a need to develop a common language of the issues we are facing and to learn from programs and best practices that are available.
  • It is important to bridge connections among sectors to ensure resources are being leveraged and that separate entities are not duplicating efforts. This requires looking at current expenditures and how they can be deployed differently.
  • There should be an increase in advocacy to protect public benefit programs that have been under threat. The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) program is the number one program to lift people out of poverty. It is estimated that without the EITC, 840,000 people would be living in poverty.

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Resources

LA n Sync Handout

 

Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education: Assessing Gaps in College Access, Attainment, and Debt to Create a Brighter Future

 

Key Takeaways

  • Over the past two decades, the U.S. population has grown not only more educated but also more racially and ethnically diverse and still, great differences exist between race, ethnicity, and gender in where students go to college and what they study. This creates an uneven playing field in the labor market and threatens intergenerational upward mobility. How students pay for higher education varies considerably by race and ethnicity, especially in terms of who borrows and who leaves college with high levels of student loan debt. Furthermore, racial and ethnic diversity among college faculty, staff, and administrators still doesn’t reflect the representation of today’s college students.
  • More than 55% of all undergraduates (65+% of African American undergraduates) are “post-traditional” (i.e., independent, 25-years old+, in the military, or working full-time). Beyond financial aid, wraparound supports are vital.  Examples of support include summer camps, after-school services, and on-campus childcare.
  • We are facing alarming workforce gaps. Workforce requirements cannot be fulfilled solely from white people and current college graduates.

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Resources

Presentation

Race & Ethnicity in Higher Education Report

 

 

Reimagining the Great Equalizer: New Strategies in Sports Based 

 

Key Takeaways

  • Play Equity has been the result of a shift in philanthropy to include an equity framework that addresses structured play as an equity issue. There is a strong correlation between access and wealth which is consistently aggravated by defunding since sports are not seen as instrumental to creating equity.
  • Intentional youth-based development through play results in a positive identity. Sports transform relationships between youth and staff. Youth in sports also gain social power through engagement in the community.
  • Solutions currently being explored include investment through philanthropic partnership, subsidizing evaluations to facilitate data aggregation and utilization, and renewed relationships with community spaces particularly in communities with limited green space.

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Resources

Sports Based Youth Development Algorithm

Sports Based Youth Development Handout

 

The Hidden Biases of Good People: Implications for Philanthropy, Nonprofit Organizations, and the Communities They Serve

 

Key Takeaways

  • Implicit Bias is unavoidable, we are pre-wired to associate traits with individuals or traits with groups.
  • We tend to treat in-group members better than out-group members. When a person has bias and a position of power through the roles they play in society, this affects their impact on a targeted group that advantages or disadvantages said group.
  • To take an Implicit Association Test developed by Harvard please click here.

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Afternoon Keynote

 

The Future Started Yesterday
Trista Harris & Peter Laugharn

 

Resources

Presentation

Creating Your Ideal Future Handout

 

 

Afternoon Breakout Sessions

 

Funding the Arts for Social Justice and Economic Prosperity

 

Key Takeaways

  • Art is all around us! So where is the funding for the arts? Arts is required by the California statute to be taught in schools where 90% of schools are violating this law. Furthermore, only 60% of majority-black schools have a music teacher compared to 90% of majority-white schools.
  • Every single initiative in the grant community should be inclusive of people with disabilities. Art serves as a vehicle to create a more inclusive, accessible world. “What we are trying to create here is systemic change”– Marisa Hamamoto, Infinite Flow

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Resources

Presentation

 

Community-Driven Philanthropy: Putting Nonprofits and Communities in the Driver's Seat

 

Key Takeaways

  • Strong authentic relationships with nonprofits are important and lead to relevant strategies and frameworks. Not having these relationships leads to misinformed solutions and no buy-in from the community as they do not see themselves represented. Trust-based philanthropy, like community-driven philanthropy, requires foundations to acknowledge power dynamics and see how they affect the creation of authentic relationships with grantees.
  • Funders can put trust into practice by providing multi-year unrestricted funding, simplifying and streamlining paperwork, soliciting and acting on feedback from grantees, as well as being transparent and responsive.
  • Philanthropy needs to let go of paternalism. Funders need to recognize that they will not always know the answers and that they need to be willing to listen to solutions. There is a need for funders to rethink how they grant and to engage with nonprofits as partners and resources. Sometimes it can be difficult getting buy-in at all levels of leadership within a foundation. To combat this problem, there needs to be a conversation about the foundation's values and what barriers are put into place with grants that are hindering their values.

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Resources

Presentation

Community Participation Spectrum Handout

 

Labor, Climate Change, and a Just Transition: Building a Future for People and the Planet

 

Key Takeaways

  • A just transition is often falsely presented as a false dichotomy of either caring for the environment versus having jobs. The labor and environmental movements are natural allies. Service Employees International Union was the first union organization to support the Green New Deal because they saw the opportunity and need to restore and strengthen a climate-social safety net.
  • It is not just an economic imperative to the shifting climate need but also a social imperative as we cannot continue to exacerbate inequality for disenfranchised or low-income communities who already bear the brunt of environmental injustices.
  • Despite the political clout of this environmental necessity, we do not have a shortage of resources, such as available jobs or training programs, but instead, we have a shortage of priorities. It costs $389 billion to transition from fossil-fuel industries, but we still do not see legislative progress. Funders can first and foremost, divest from fossil-fuel industries.

Download Key Takeaways

 

Resources

Presentation

Just Transition Final Report

 

Redefining Education Philanthropy: Trends and Implications for Future Learners

 

Key Takeaways

  • Trends in Education Philanthropy have markedly increased their focus on the learning stages before and after K-12 education. Funders are committed to collaborating and advancing education equity although have low confidence in federal government leadership.
  • Systems & institutional change is needed for post-secondary education to focus on economic accessibility and equity of educational attainment. There is a crisis in dropout rates, debt, and access to jobs. Higher education needs to prepare students for the workforce.
  • Early interventions are needed in early childhood learning. There are lifelong impacts of early childhood trauma on social/emotional learning and executive function. Education needs to support the whole-child format at the local level including health services and counseling.
  • There is a need for teacher development and retention. Teachers deal with secondary effects of interacting with students who’ve experienced trauma. Teacher development and retention strategies are also successful at retaining teachers of color.

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Resources

Presentation

Trends in Education Philanthropy Benchmarking

 

 

Securing the Future: Making a Case for Gender-Lens Investing

 

Key Takeaways

  • Studies show that having women on boards increases the company’s rate of return significantly. Estimates show that a board with one woman increases rate of return by 15% and a board with 2-3 or more women doubles the rates of return.
  • Utilizing smart investment tools such as AsYouSow.org lets you look at how mutual funds are performing under various topics including gender.

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The Future of Good and You

 

Resources

Presentation

Creating your Ideal Future Handout

 

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